Why the apple doesn't fall far : understanding intergenerational transmission of human capital

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDevereux, Paul J.-
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Sandra E.-
dc.contributor.authorSalvanes, Kjell G.-
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-12T16:25:06Z-
dc.date.available2008-12-12T16:25:06Z-
dc.date.copyrightThe Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) 2003en
dc.date.issued2003-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/750-
dc.description.abstractParents with higher education levels have children with higher education levels. However, is this because parental education actually changes the outcomes of children, suggesting an important spillover of education policies, or is it merely that more able individuals who have higher education also have more able children? This paper proposes to answer this question by using a unique dataset from Norway. Using the reform of the education system that was implemented in different municipalities at different times in the 1960s as an instrument for parental education, we find little evidence of a causal relationship between parents’ education and children’s education, despite significant OLS relationships. We find 2SLS estimates that are consistently lower than the OLS estimates with the only statistically significant effect being a positive relationship between mother's education and son's education. These findings suggest that the high correlations between parents’ and children’s education are due primarily to family characteristics and inherited ability and not education spillovers.en
dc.format.extent4304 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute for the Study of Laboren
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIZA Discussion Paper Seriesen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNo. 926en
dc.relation.uriWhy the apple doesn't fall far : understanding intergenerational transmission of human capital (March 2005)en
dc.relation.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/309en
dc.subjectIntergenerational mobilityen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectEducational reformen
dc.subject.classificationI21en
dc.subject.classificationJ13en
dc.subject.classificationJ24en
dc.subject.lcshEducational attainmenten
dc.subject.lcshParent and childen
dc.subject.lcshEducational change--Norwayen
dc.titleWhy the apple doesn't fall far : understanding intergenerational transmission of human capitalen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.internal.authorurlPaul J. Devereux (web page)en
dc.internal.authorurlhttp://www.ucd.ie/research/people/economics/professorpauldevereux/en
dc.internal.authoridUCD0006en
dc.internal.availabilityFull text availableen
dc.internal.webversionshttp://ftp.iza.org/dp926.pdf-
dc.statusNot peer revieweden
dc.neeo.contributorDevereux|Paul J.|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorBlack|Sandra E.|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorSalvanes|Kjell G.|aut|-
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
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