The economic boom, bust and transport inequity in suburban Dublin, Ireland

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Title: The economic boom, bust and transport inequity in suburban Dublin, Ireland
Authors: Rock, Sarah
Aharen, Aoife
Caulfield, Brian
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/8086
Date: 2016
Abstract: This paper examines the existence and extent of transport inequity and disadvantage in new suburbs in Dublin, built during the Celtic Tiger period and as experienced during the recession. Findings are presented from a household postal survey from three case study areas built between 2001 and 2008. The case study areas are typical 'middle class' suburbs, and were constructed at a time when Ireland was experiencing unprecedented economic growth. The subsequent recession left many of these areas in significant negative equity, and householders with very limited housing mobility. Results from the survey point to considerable problems that are impacting on population groups typically vulnerable to transport disadvantage, such as low income earners and car-less households. The study also highlights the burdens on middle and high income households, and those who are experiencing 'forced car ownership'. The paper concludes with a commentary on how the findings might be used to inform better transport and planning policy.
Funding Details: University College Dublin
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright (published version): 2016 Elsevier
Keywords: Economy and recessionTransport equityTransport disadvantageCar related economic stressForced car ownership
DOI: 10.1016/j.retrec.2016.09.003
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Civil Engineering Research Collection

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