Examining the Media Portrayal of Obesity Through the Lens of the Common Sense Model of Illness Representations

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Title: Examining the Media Portrayal of Obesity Through the Lens of the Common Sense Model of Illness Representations
Authors: De Brún, Aoife
McCarthy, Mary
McKenzie, Kenneth
McGloin, Aileen
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/8104
Date: 8-Nov-2014
Abstract: This study examined the Irish media discourse on obesity by employing the Common Sense Model of Illness Representations. A media sample of 368 transcripts was compiled from newspaper articles (n = 346), radio discussions (n = 5), and online news articles (n = 17) on overweight and obesity from the years 2005, 2007, and 2009. Using the Common Sense Model and framing theory to guide the investigation, a thematic analysis was conducted on the media sample. Analysis revealed that the behavioral dimensions of diet and activity levels were the most commonly cited causes of and interventions in obesity. The advertising industry was blamed for obesity, and there were calls for increased government action to tackle the issue. Physical illness and psychological consequences of obesity were prevalent in the sample, and analysis revealed that the economy, regardless of its state, was blamed for obesity. These results are discussed in terms of expectations of audience understandings of the issue and the implications of these dominant portrayals and framings on public support for interventions. The article also outlines the value of a qualitative analytical framework that combines the Common Sense Model and framing theory in the investigation of illness narratives.
Funding Details: Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine
Health Research Board
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Copyright (published version): 2015 Taylor and Francis
Keywords: Obesity;Media representations;Content analysis;Ireland
DOI: 10.1080/10410236.2013.866390
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Nursing, Midwifery & Health Systems Research Collection
Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science Research Collection

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