Why Do Some Insurgent Groups Agree to Cease-Fires While Others Do Not? A Within-Case Analysis of Burma/Myanmar, 1948-2011

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Title: Why Do Some Insurgent Groups Agree to Cease-Fires While Others Do Not? A Within-Case Analysis of Burma/Myanmar, 1948-2011
Authors: Dukalskis, Alexander
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/8472
Date: 25-Jun-2015
Abstract: This article uses Burma/Myanmar from 1948 to 2011 as a within-case context to explore why some armed insurgent groups agree to cease-fires while others do not. Analyzing 33 armed groups it finds that longer-lived groups were less likely to agree to cease-fires with the military government between 1989 and 2011. The article uses this within-case variation to understand what characteristics would make an insurgent group more or less likely to agree to a cease-fire. The article identifies four armed groups for more in-depth qualitative analysis to understand the roles of the administration of territory, ideology, and legacies of distrust with the state as drivers of the decision to agree to or reject a cease-fire.
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Copyright (published version): 2015 Taylor and Francis
Keywords: Civil wars;Armed conflicts;Ceasefires
DOI: 10.1080/1057610X.2015.1056631
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Politics and International Relations Research Collection

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