Second Chance for High-school Dropouts? A Regression Discontinuity Analysis of Postsecondary Educational Returns to the GED

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Title: Second Chance for High-school Dropouts? A Regression Discontinuity Analysis of Postsecondary Educational Returns to the GED
Authors: Jepsen, Christopher
Mueser, Peter
Troske, Kenneth
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/9008
Date: Jul-2017
Abstract: We evaluate the educational returns to General Educational Development (GED) certification using state administrative data. We use fuzzy regression discontinuity (FRD) methods to account for the fact that GED test takers can repeatedly retake the test until they pass it and the fact that test takers have to pass all five subtests before receiving the GED. We find that the GED increases the likelihood of postsecondary attendance and course completion substantially, but the GED impact on overall credits completed is modest: The GED causes an average increment of only two credits for men and six credits for women.
Funding Details: European Commission
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Journal: Journal of Labor Economics
Volume: 35
Issue: S1
Start page: 273
End page: 304
Copyright (published version): 2017 University of Chicago
Keywords: General Educational Development (GED) testPostsecondary attendancePostsecondary creditsPostsecondary course completionPostsecondary award receipt
DOI: 10.1086/691391
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Economics Research Collection

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