Bacterial endosymbionts influence host sexuality and reveal reproductive genes of early divergent fungi

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMondo, Stephen J.-
dc.contributor.authorLastovetsky, Olga A.-
dc.contributor.authorGaspar, Maria L.-
dc.contributor.authoret al.-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-11T10:55:06Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-11T10:55:06Z-
dc.date.copyright2017 the Authorsen_US
dc.date.issued2017-11-29-
dc.identifier.citationNature communicationsen_US
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/9917-
dc.description.abstractMany heritable mutualisms, in which beneficial symbionts are transmitted vertically between host generations, originate as antagonisms with parasite dispersal constrained by the host. Only after the parasite gains control over its transmission is the symbiosis expected to transition from antagonism to mutualism. Here, we explore this prediction in the mutualism between the fungus Rhizopus microsporus (Rm, Mucoromycotina) and a beta-proteobacterium Burkholderia, which controls host asexual reproduction. We show that reproductive addiction of Rm to endobacteria extends to mating, and is mediated by the symbiont gaining transcriptional control of the fungal ras2 gene, which encodes a GTPase central to fungal reproductive development. We also discover candidate G-protein-coupled receptors for the perception of trisporic acids, mating pheromones unique to Mucoromycotina. Our results demonstrate that regulating host asexual proliferation and modifying its sexual reproduction are sufficient for the symbiont's control of its own transmission, needed for antagonism-to-mutualism transition in heritable symbioses. These properties establish the Rm-Burkholderia symbiosis as a powerful system for identifying reproductive genes in Mucoromycotina.en_US
dc.format.mediumElectronic-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectBurkholderiaen_US
dc.subjectFungal reproductive developmenten_US
dc.subjectMucoromycotinaen_US
dc.subjectRhizopusen_US
dc.subjectSymbiosisen_US
dc.subjectPhylogenyen_US
dc.subjectGene Regulatory Networksen_US
dc.subjectGene Expression Regulationen_US
dc.titleBacterial endosymbionts influence host sexuality and reveal reproductive genes of early divergent fungien_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.internal.authorcontactotherolga.lastovetsky@ucd.ieen_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.startpage1en_US
dc.identifier.endpage9en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-017-02052-8-
dc.neeo.contributorMondo|Stephen J.|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorLastovetsky|Olga A.|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorGaspar|Maria L.|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributoret al.||aut|-
dc.description.othersponsorshipNational Science Foundationen_US
dc.description.othersponsorshipNational Institutes of Healthen_US
dc.description.othersponsorshipOffice of Science of the U.S. Department of Energyen_US
dc.date.updated2019-04-02T08:05:25Z-
dc.identifier.grantidDEB-0918880-
dc.identifier.grantidIOS-1261004-
dc.identifier.grantidDBI-1263103-
dc.identifier.grantidGM-19629-
dc.identifier.grantidDE-AC02-05CH11231-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextopen-
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