Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • Publication
    Evidence that common variation in NEDD9 is associated with susceptibility to late-onset Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease
    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most common neurodegenerative disorders and in both diseases susceptibility is known to be influenced by genes. We set out to identify novel susceptibility genes for LOAD by performing a large scale, multi-tiered association study testing 4692 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs). We identified a SNP within a putative transcription factor binding site in the NEDD9 gene (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated), that shows good evidence of association with disease risk in four out of five LOAD samples [N = 3521, P = 5.38x10(-6), odds ratio (OR) = 1.38 (1.20-1.59)] and in addition, we observed a similar pattern of association in two PD sample sets [N = 1464, P = 0.0145, OR =1.31 (1.05-1.62)]. In exploring a potential mechanism for the association, we observed that expression of NEDD9 and APOE show a strong inverse correlation in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's cases. These data implicate NEDD9 as a novel susceptibility gene for LOAD and possibly PD.
      274ScopusĀ© Citations 36
  • Publication
    Large-scale linkage analysis of 1302 affected relative pairs with rheumatoid arthritis
    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common systematic autoimmune disease and its etiology is believed to have both strong genetic and environmental components. We demonstrate the utility of including genetic and clinical phenotypes as covariates within a linkage analysis framework to search for rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci. The raw genotypes of 1302 affected relative pairs were combined from four large family-based samples (North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium, United Kingdom, European Consortium on Rheumatoid Arthritis Families, and Canada). The familiality of the clinical phenotypes was assessed. The affected relative pairs were subjected to autosomal multipoint affected relative-pair linkage analysis. Covariates were included in the linkage analysis to take account of heterogeneity within the sample. Evidence of familiality was observed with age at onset (p << 0.001) and rheumatoid factor (RF) IgM (p << 0.001), but not definite erosions (p = 0.21). Genome-wide significant evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 6. Genome-wide suggestive evidence for linkage was observed on chromosomes 13 and 20 when conditioning on age at onset, chromosome 15 conditional on gender, and chromosome 19 conditional on RF IgM after allowing for multiple testing of covariates.
      449
  • Publication
    Combining linkage data sets for meta-analysis and mega-analysis: the GAW15 rheumatoid arthritis data set
    We have used the genome-wide marker genotypes from Genetic Analysis Workshop 15 Problem 2 to explore joint evidence for genetic linkage to rheumatoid arthritis across several samples. The data consisted of four high-density genome scans on samples selected for rheumatoid arthritis. We cleaned the data, removed intermarker linkage disequilibrium, and assembled the samples onto a common genetic map using genome sequence positions as a reference for map interpolation. The individual studies were combined first at the genotype level (mega-analysis) prior to a multipoint linkage analysis on the combined sample, and second using the genome scan meta-analysis method after linkage analysis of each sample. The two approaches were compared, and give strong support to the HLA locus on chromosome 6 as a susceptibility locus. Other regions of interest include loci on chromosomes 11, 2, and 12.
      240
  • Publication
    Analyses of single marker and pairwise effects of candidate loci for rheumatoid arthritis using logistic regression and random forests
    Using parametric and nonparametric techniques, our study investigated the presence of single locus and pairwise effects between 20 markers of the Genetic Analysis Workshop 15 (GAW15) North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium (NARAC) candidate gene data set (Problem 2), analyzing 463 independent patients and 855 controls. Specifically, our work examined the correspondence between logistic regression (LR) analysis of single-locus and pairwise interaction effects, and random forest (RF) single and joint importance measures. For this comparison, we selected small but stable RFs (500 trees), which showed strong correlations (r~0.98) between their importance measures and those by RFs grown on 5000 trees. Both RF importance measures captured most of the LR single-locus and pairwise interaction effects, while joint importance measures also corresponded to full LR models containing main and interaction effects. We furthermore showed that RF measures were particularly sensitive to data imputation. The most consistent pairwise effect on rheumatoid arthritis was found between two markers within MAP3K7IP2/SUMO4 on 6q25.1, although LR and RFs assigned different significance levels.Within a hypothetical two-stage design, pairwise LR analysis of all markers with significant RF single importance would have reduced the number of possible combinations in our small data set by 61%, whereas joint importance measures would have been less efficient for marker pair reduction. This suggests that RF single importance measures, which are able to detect a wide range of interaction effects and are computationally very efficient, might be exploited as pre-screening tool for larger association studies. Follow-up analysis, such as by LR, is required since RFs do not indicate high-risk genotype combinations.
      235