Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • Publication
    An Investigation of the psychosocial impact of a compensation tribunal on women with an iatrogenic Hepatitis C infection
    (Irish Medical Organization, 2003-03) ; ; ;
    The aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial impact of a Compensation Tribunal in women with an iatrogenic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Eighty-three women diagnosed with an iatrogenic HCV infection were recruited, 19 women were Pre-Tribunal and 64 women were post-Tribunal. Both standardised and disease specific psychological measures were used. A series of t-tests revealed no differences in psychological well-being and adjustment to HCV infection in women pre and post Compensation Tribunal. Chi-square tests revealed no association between PCR status and 1) psychological well-being and 2) experience of anger/blame in women post- Compensation Tribunal. A further series of t-tests revealed that women with high levels of anger and blame post-Compensation Tribunal perceived their future as more uncertain, experienced more pain, low self-esteem and psychological distress, viewed their ability to work as impeded and complained of increased stress preparing for their Compensation Tribunal. This study suggests that poor adjustment in women with an iatrogenic HCV infection post-Compensation Tribunal is not associated with attendance at a Compensation Tribunal nor PCR status but rather to experiences of anger and blame.
      374
  • Publication
    Factors related to the adjustment of siblings following sudden infant death
    Participants in this study were 119 siblings of children who had died from sudden infant death and their parents. This non-representative self-selected group, were profiled as 11 year old boys or girls from middle or upper-middle class intact families whose siblings had died a sudden death about 7 years before the study. Mothers who participated were in their late 30s and fathers were in the early 50s, with a third of families being rurally based and the rest living in urban settings. 18% obtained T-scores above the cut-off of 63 on the total problem scale or the Child Behaviour Checklist. These clinical cases had lower self-esteem and a more external locus of control compared with the rest of the group. Their fathers and mothers also had lower self-esteem and their mothers were more poorly psychologically adjusted. Compared with the non-clinical group, both mothers and fathers in the clinical group perceived marked problems in family functioning. From a wide range of measures of personal, parental and family characteristics, siblings' self-esteem, maternal mental health and siblings' locus of control were identified in a series of stepwise multiple regression analyses as the most significant predictors of siblings' adjustment.
      342
  • Publication
    Nursing and Midwifery Workforce Readiness during a Global Pandemic: A Survey of the Experience of one hospital group in the Republic of Ireland
    Aim: To explore the mobilisation of nurses/midwives in a designated hospital group in Ireland during a global pandemic.Background: The recent global pandemic has resulted in the large-scale worldwide mobilisation of Registered Nurses and Midwives working in the acute care sector. There is a dearth of literature reporting the mobilisation of this professional workforce.Method: Mixed-methods design using an electronic survey and facilitated discussion across one Irish hospital group.Results: Eight of 11 hospitals responded to the survey. There was a 2% vacancy rate prior to the pandemic. Mobilisation included reconfiguration of clinical areas and redeployment of 9% of the nursing/midwifery workforce within two weeks of the pandemic. A total of 11% (n=343) of nurses/midwives were redeployed in three months. Nurses/midwives required re-skilling in infection prevention control, enhancement of critical care skills and documentation.Conclusions: Three key areas were identified to enable the nursing workforce readiness. These are referred to as the three ‘R’s’: Reconfiguration of specific resources; Redeployment of nurses to dedicated specialist areas and Re-skilling of nurses to safely care for the patients during the pandemic.Implications for Nursing Management: A centralised approach to Reconfiguration of clinical areas. Redeployment is enabled by closing non-essential departments. Hands-on re-skilling and reorientating staff are essential.
      524Scopus© Citations 5
  • Publication
    Factors related to the adjustment of siblings following sudden infant death
    Participants in this study were 119 siblings of children who had died from sudden infant death and their parents. This non-representative self-selected group, were profiled as 11 year old boys or girls from middle or uppermiddle class intact families whose siblings had died a sudden death about 7 years before the study. The average age of mothers who participated were in their late 30s and the average age of fathers were in the early 50s, with a third of families being rurally based and the rest living in urban settings. 18% obtained T-scores above the cut-off of 63 on the total problem scale of the Child Behaviour Checklist. These cIjnical cases had lower selfesteem and a more external locus of control compared with the rest of the group. Their fathers and mothers also had lower self-esteem and their mothers were more poorly psychologically adjusted. Compared with the non-clinical group, both mothers and fathers in the clinical group perceived marked problems in family functioning. From a wide range of measures of personal, parental and family characteristics, siblings' self-esteem, maternal mental health and siblings' locus of control were identified in a series of stepwise multiple regression analyses as the most significant predictors of siblings' adjustment.
      351Scopus© Citations 1
  • Publication
    The Role of CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine): The Different Perspectives of Patients, Oncology Professionals and CAM Practitioners
    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the different perspectives of women with breast cancer, oncology professionals and CAM practitioners regarding the role of CAM in the cancer setting. While all three stakeholder groups considered CAM as supportive, perspectives differed among oncology professionals and CAM practitioners regarding the manner in which this was so.
      401
  • Publication
    Nurses', Physicians' and Radiographers' Perceptions of the Safety of a Nurse Prescribing of Ionising Radiation Initiative: A Cross-Sectional Survey
    Background: A new initiative was introduced in Ireland following legislative changes that allowed nurses with special training to prescribe ionising radiation (X-ray) for the first time. A small number of studies on nurse prescribing of ionising radiation in other contexts have found it to be broadly as safe as ionising radiation prescribing by physicians. Sociological literature on perceptions of safety indicate that these tend to be shaped by the ideological position of the professional rather than based on objective evidence. Objectives: To describe, compare and analyse perceptions of the safety of a nurse prescribing of ionising radiation initiative across three occupational groups: nursing, radiography and medicine. Design: A cross-sectional survey design. Settings: Participants were drawn from a range of clinical settings in Ireland. Sample: Respondents were 167 health professionals comprised of 49 nurses, 91 radiographers, and 27 physicians out of a total of 300 who were invited to participate. Non-probability sampling was employed and the survey was targeted specifically at health professionals with a specific interest in, or involvement with, the development of the nurse prescribing of ionising radiation initiative in Ireland. Methods: Comparisons of perspectives on the safety of nurse prescribing of ionising radiation across the three occupational groups captured by questionnaire were analysed using the Kruskal Wallis H test. Pairwise post hoc tests were conducted using the Mann Whitney U test. Results: While the majority of respondents from all three groups perceived nurse prescribing of ionising radiation to be safe, the extent to which this view was held varied. A higher proportion of nurses was found to display confidence in the safety of nurse prescribing of ionising radiation compared to physicians and radiographers with differences between nurses’ perceptions and those of the other two groups being statistically significant. Conclusion: That an occupational patterning emerged suggests that perceptions about safety and risk of nurse prescribing of ionising radiation are socially constructed according to the vantage point of the professional and may not reflect objective measures of safety. These findings need to be considered more broadly in the context of ideological barriers to expanding the role of nurses.
      664Scopus© Citations 9