Now showing 1 - 7 of 7
  • Publication
    Capacity value of wind power: summary
    The capacity value of a generator is the contribution that a given generator makes to generation system adequacy. Due to the variable and stochastic nature of wind, the modeling of wind generation in the same manner as conventional generation for capacity value calculation is inappropriate. In this paper a short summary of the issue is given. This summary is largely based on IEA task 25 activities and the output of an IEEE task force. A preferred method for calculating capacity value along with approximate methods for the calculation are also described with their limitations outlined.
      447
  • Publication
    Impacts of large amounts of wind power on design and operation of power systems, results of IEA collaboration
    There are a multitude of studies made and ongoing related to cost of wind integration. However, the results are not easy to compare. An international forum for exchange of knowledge of power system impacts of wind power has been formed under the IEA Implementing Agreement on Wind Energy. IEA WIND R&D Task 25 on “Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power” has produced a state of the art report in October 2007, where the most relevant wind power grid integration studies are analysed especially regarding methodologies and input data. This paper summarises the results from 18 case studies with discussion on the differences in the methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.
      852
  • Publication
    Capacity value of wind power
    Power systems are planned such that they have adequate generation capacity to meet the load, according to a defined reliability target. The increase in the penetration of wind generation in recent years has led to a number of challenges for the planning and operation of power systems. A key metric for generation system adequacy is the capacity value of generation. The capacity value of a generator is the contribution that a given generator makes to generation system adequacy. The variable and stochastic nature of wind sets it apart from conventional energy sources. As a result, the modeling of wind generation in the same manner as conventional generation for capacity value calculations is inappropriate. In this paper a preferred method for calculation of the capacity value of wind is described and a discussion of the pertinent issues surrounding it is given. Approximate methods for the calculation are also described with their limitations highlighted. The outcome of recent wind capacity value analyses in Europe and North America, along with some new analysis are highlighted with a discussion of relevant issues also given.
      2142Scopus© Citations 289
  • Publication
    Variability of load and net load in case of large scale distributed wind power
    Large scale wind power production and its variability is one of the major inputs to wind integration studies. This paper analyses measured data from large scale wind power production. Comparisons of variability are made across several variables: time scale (10-60 minute ramp rates), number of wind farms, and simulated vs. modeled data. Ramp rates for Wind power production, Load (total system load) and Net load (load minus wind power production) demonstrate how wind power increases the net load variability. Wind power will also change the timing of daily ramps.
      790
  • Publication
    Impact of wind power on the unit commitment, operating reserves, and market design
    This article highlights and demonstrates the new requirements variable and partly unpredictable wind power will bring to unit commitment and power system operations. Current practice is described and contrasted against the new requirements. Literature specifically addressing questions about wind power and unit commitment related power system operations is surveyed. The scope includes forecast errors, operating reserves, intra-day markets, and sharing reserves across interconnections. The discussion covers the critical issues arising from the research.
      968Scopus© Citations 39
  • Publication
    Current methods to calculate capacity credit of wind power, IEA collaboration
    Power systems must have enough generation to meet demand at each moment of the day. In addition, they must also have enough reserve to deal with unexpected contingencies. The increase in the penetration of wind generation in recent years has led to a number of challenges in the calculations required to facilitate wind generation while maintaining the existing level of security of supply. A key calculation in this process is the capacity credit or value of wind generation. Capacity credit/value of wind generation can be broadly defined as the amount of firm conventional generation capacity that can be replaced with wind generation capacity, while maintaining the existing levels of security of supply. This topic has been the subject of much study and debate in recent times. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the state of the art in this area, in particular with regard to the work of IEA WIND Task 25 and the work detailed in its state of the art report on the design and operation of power systems with large amounts of wind power.
      2231Scopus© Citations 58
  • Publication
    Impacts of large amounts of wind power on design and operation of power systems, results of IEA collaboration
    (Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons), 2011-03-14) ; ; ;
    There are dozens of studies made and ongoing related to wind integration. However, the results are not easy to compare. IEA WIND R&D Task 25 on ‘Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power’ collects and shares information on wind generation impacts on power systems, with analyses and guidelines on methodologies. In the state-of-the-art report (October, 2007), and the final report of the 3 years period (July, 2009) the most relevant wind power grid integration studies have been analysed especially regarding methodologies and input data. Several issues that impact on the amount of wind power that can be integrated have been identified. Large balancing areas and aggregation benefits of wide areas help in reducing the variability and forecast errors of wind power as well as help in pooling more cost effective balancing resources. System operation and functioning electricity markets at less than day-ahead time scales help reduce forecast errors of wind power. Transmission is the key to aggregation benefits, electricity markets and larger balancing areas. Best practices in wind integration studies are described. There is also benefit when adding wind power to power systems: it reduces the total operating costs and emissions as wind replaces fossil fuels and this should be highlighted more in future studies.
      4615Scopus© Citations 272