Now showing 1 - 10 of 24
  • Publication
    The physiological effects of low level electrical stimulation on short term recovery from supra maximal exercise bouts : a case study
    Inadequate recovery from short-term, high-intensity bouts of exercise can be a limiting factor to optimal sporting performance [1]. Previous research investigating recovery from intense exercise using various intervention protocols (e.g., active recovery, massage, cold and contrast water therapy, compression suits etc.) have generally found positive results when compared to passive recovery [2,3]. A recent study utilised electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) as an intervention for short-term recovery (< 1 hr) between bouts of intense exercise [4]. They concluded that EMS shows promise as an alternate recovery treatment for lowering blood lactate when compared to passive recovery.
      1002
  • Publication
    A comparison of the movement patterns of specific rugby union movements on both natural turf and artificial turf
    A limitation of sports kinematic studies is that they cannot fully represent in-situ play conditions for fast dynamic sports. This paper describes the use of new inertial sensor measurement technology (ODonovan et al., 2009) to analyse player motions in the field under game-like conditions in order to quantify the impact of different playing surfaces on movement patterns. The wireless sensor system used in this study (Shimmer 3, Shimmer Research, Ireland) is a lightweight (50x25x12.5mm3), wearable, low-power consumption inertial measurement unit that contains a tri-axial accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer. Sensor data can be used to derive a range of spatiotemporal and kinematic variables to quantify performance during gait and other functional activities. In our research we are using these sensors as a means to characterise movement during a running activity. The motivation for this study has been to compare movement profiles and strategies of rugby players performing game related tasks on natural turf surfaces and on synthetic surfaces, to enable a better understanding of the impact of different playing surfaces on movement and associated forces and stresses exerted on the body. This is important as there is a growing trend towards use of synthetic surfaces in rugby union and there have been anecdotal reports of injuries that are perceived to be related to the playing surface. In this paper we present preliminary movement data acquired from players performing a 10m sprint test on natural and synthetic surfaces and describe our methods of data extraction and subsequent data processing.
      134
  • Publication
    A pilot investigation into the effects of electrical muscle stimulation training on physical fitness in an adult cystic fibrosis population
    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting genetic disease in caucasians. Skeletal muscle weakness and exercise intolerance is prevalent in people with cystic fibrosis. Although higher levels of fitness have been associated with better quality of well-being and improved eight year survival training among individuals with CF is limited due to fatigue, hypoxaemia and dyspnoea.Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has demonstrated improvements in muscle strength, exercise tolerance and aerobic capacity in cardiorespiratory disease populations, while having minimal impact on oxygen saturation levels and heart rate.
      663
  • Publication
    The effects of an electrical muscle stimulation training intervention on physiological measures in a spinal cord injury male
    Participation in aerobic exercise activity is considered necessary for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reduce the potential development of common co-morbidities associated with SCI such as cardiovascular (CV) disease, reduced bone mineral density (BMD), increases in body fat and decreases in lean body mass. Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) has been advocated as offering a feasible exercise regime to SCI individuals. FES studies have reported improvements in BMD, CV fitness, body composition (BC) and quality of life (QOL), however its application is limited by its effect on muscle fatigue, as well as the need for specialist equipment and training. Recently, researchers have developed a new type of electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) system, which appears to overcome the above issues. This system has improved heart rate (HR) and peak muscle oxygen consumption (VO2) within Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) patients, obese and sedentary adults [3,4]. An SCI population may benefit from a similar intervention and justifies further research into the effects this EMS system may have on SCI.
      730
  • Publication
    A pilot investigation into the effects of electrical muscle stimulation training on physical fitness in an adult cystic fibrosis population
    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting genetic disease in Caucasians. [1] Progressive respiratory and gastro intestinal disease are the predominant clinical manifestations of the disease. As a consequence of general de-conditioning, skeletal muscle weakness and exercise intolerance is prevalent among patients with CF. [2] Although higher levels of fitness have been associated with better quality of wellbeing and eight-year survival, training among individuals with CF is limited due to fatigue, hypoxemia and dyspnoea. [3] Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) has demonstrated improvements in muscle strength, exercise tolerance and aerobic capacity in chronic cardio respiratory disease populations, while having minimal impact on heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation levels. [4,5]
      158
  • Publication
    Automatic Detection of Tackles in Elite Level Rugby Union
    Elite rugby union teams currently employ technology in order to monitor and evaluate the physical demands of training and games on their players. Tackling has been shown to be the most common cause of injury in rugby union (Fuller et al. (2007a), Garraway et al. (1999)). However, current player monitoring technology does not effectively evaluate player tackling measurements. Sensing devices, currently being used by elite rugby union teams, contain a GPS receiver and a 3-axis accelerometer. GPS has been utilized to measure player speed and distance. Accelerometers, on the other hand, have an under-utilized potential to analyse body impact and collisions.
      644
  • Publication
    Acute physiological responses to electrical muscle stimulation in a spinal cord injured man – a case study
    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is a leading cause of death in populations with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) and is contributed to by a lack of opportunities to engage in physical activity as well as limited motor function [1]. Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) has been suggested as a novel CV training tool to alleviate this problem associated with SCI by increasing peak oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) [2]. However the use of FES is limited by its effect on muscle fatigue as well as the need for specialist equipment and training. Our research group have devised an electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) training device which has improved CV health in obese and chronic heart failure populations [3], whose symptoms are akin to those of SCI patients with CV symptoms. These results warrant further investigation into this system`s effects on the CV health of people with SCI.
      348
  • Publication
    The effects of electrical muscle stimulation training in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease population – a pilot study
    Exercise training is currently advocated as a therapeutic modality for improving the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) -including peripheral muscle dysfunction, decreased exercise tolerance, weight loss, depletion of muscle mass and muscle strength and poor health status. Owing to a limited cardiopulmonary reserve, COPD patients are frequently physically unable to tolerate sufficient training intensities which would afford them with the benefits associated with conventional exercise training interventions. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) appears to have a limited demand on ventilatory requirements and dyspnoea, and may be a promising exercise training alternative for patients with COPD.
      293
  • Publication
    Challenging Concussed Athletes: The Future of Balance Assessment in Concussion
    The assessment and management of sports-related concussion has become a contentious issue in the field of sports medicine. The current consensus in concussion evaluation involves the use of a subjective examination, supported by multifactorial assessment batteries designed to target the various components of cerebral function. Balance assessment forms an important component of this multifactorial assessment, as it can provide an insight into the function of the sensorimotor subsystems post-concussion. In recent times, there has been a call to develop objective clinical assessments that can aid in the assessment and monitoring of concussion. However, traditional static balance assessments are derived from neurologically impaired populations, are subjective in nature, do not adequately challenge high functioning athletes and may not be capable of detecting subtle balance disturbances following a concussive event. In this review, we provide an overview of the importance of assessing motor function following a concussion, and the challenges facing clinicians in its assessment and monitoring. Additionally, we discuss the limitations of the current clinical methods employed in balance assessment, the role of technology in improving the objectivity of traditional assessments, and the potential role inexpensive portable technology may play in providing objective measures of more challenging dynamic tasks.
      220Scopus© Citations 20
  • Publication
    An investigation into the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation exercise in type 2 diabetes : a case study
    Exercise is a vital component in the management and prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Both the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) advocate exercise as a treatment method for T2D. However, given the benefits of engaging in physical activity, many T2D patients are often unable to partake in physical activity secondary to complications of their diabetes or other musculoskeletal problems. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) exercise is a likely alternative for diabetic individuals who face barriers to physical activity. NMES has received much attention in recent years as a new form of inducing exercise. The ability of NMES to stimulate innervated muscle has resulted in it’s use as a training tool for individuals without neuromuscular pathology. Banerjee and colleagues showed that prolonged NMES exercise in sedentary adults resulted in significant improvements in maximal aerobic capacity, muscle strength and capacity for physical activity. The aim of this case study was to investigate the use of NMES exercise in T2D.
      1276