Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • Publication
    Stock Exchange and Professional Accounting Requirements Applying in Both the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom
    (Aspen Law & Business, 2001) ; ;
    Stock exchange regulations and professional accounting pronouncements are largely the same in both the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and the United Kingdom (U.K.) - consequently, the material in this appendix applies to both chapters. This appendix is organized into six parts: Part 1: General items (Sections 1 and 2); Part 2: Profit and loss account items (Sections 3 to 5), Part 3: Balance sheet items (Sections 6 to 11); Part 4: Cash flow (Section 12); Part 5: Groups (Section 13) and Part 6: Smaller entities (Section 14). The appendix ends with a summary of the professional accounting pronouncements at July 2002 applicable in both the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom which is shown in Appendix 1
      191
  • Publication
    Irish Published Accounts under Scrutiny
    (Chartered Accountants Ireland, 1990-06) ;
    Published accounts are subject to more scrutiny than ever before due to increased interest in, and understanding of, accounting issues by financial analysts, business commentators and the financial press. Discussion of accounting issues in national newspapers and business magazines is now commonplace. The goodwill debate, brands accounting and off balance sheet financing are some of the more recent controversial issues. Apart from significantly increased regulation following implementation of the EC Fourth Directive and 20 years of standard setting, there is a movement to encourage voluntary disclosures and improved financial reporting; events such as the Published Accounts Award organised by the Leinster Society of Chartered Accountants are part of this movement. The recent publication of “A Survey of Irish Published Accounts” is the first independent assessment of accounting and disclosure practices of Irish companies. The survey was launched by the Minister for Industry and Commerce, Mr. Desmond O'Malley, T.D. on April 24th last at a reception in University College Dublin. The Minister welcomed the survey and said that “it provided a comprehensive body of information which can be used to judge compliance with standards, to identify problem areas in standards and to develop best practice”. He went on to say that the Irish accountancy profession would find the survey a valuable resource document when contributing to the deliberations of the international accounting standards committee, FEE, and other international organisations.
      212
  • Publication
    Impression management : developing and illustrating a scheme of analysis for narrative disclosures – a methodological note
    Purpose – This paper develops a holistic measure for analysing impression management and for detecting bias introduced into corporate narratives as a result of impression management. Design/methodology/approach – Prior research on the seven impression management methods in the literature is summarised. Four of the less-researched methods are described in detail, and are illustrated with examples from UK Annual Results’ Press Releases (ARPRs). A method of computing a holistic composite impression management score based on these four impression management methods is developed, based on both quantitative and qualitative data in corporate narrative disclosures. An impression management bias score is devised to capture the extent to which impression management introduces bias into corporate narratives. An example of the application of the composite impression management score and impression management bias score methodology is provided. Findings – While not amounting to systematic evidence, the 21 illustrative examples suggest that impression management is pervasive in corporate financial communications using multiple impression management methods, such that positive information is exaggerated, while negative information is either ignored or is underplayed. Originality/value – Four impression management methods are described in detail, illustrated by 21 examples. These four methods are examined together. New impression management methods are studied in this paper for the first time. This paper extends prior impression management measures in two ways. First, a composite impression management score based on four impression management techniques is articulated. Second, the composite impression management score methodology is extended to capture a measure for bias, in the form of an impression management bias score. This is the first time outside the US that narrative disclosures in press releases have been studied.
      11078Scopus© Citations 183
  • Publication
      329
  • Publication
    Stock Exchange and Professional Accounting Requirements Applying in Both the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom
    Stock exchange regulations and professional accounting pronouncements are largely the same in both the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and the United Kingdom (U.K.) - consequently, the material in this appendix applies to both chapters. This appendix is organized into six parts: Part 1: General items (Sections 1 and 2); Part 2: Profit and loss account items (Sections 3 to 5), Part 3: Balance sheet items (Sections 6 to 11); Part 4: Cash flow (Section 12); Part 5: Groups (Section 13) and Part 6: Smaller entities (Section 14). The appendix ends with a summary of the professional accounting pronouncements at July 2002 applicable in both the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom which is shown in Appendix 1.
      147
  • Publication
    Republic of Ireland
    (Aspen Law & Business, 2003-11-13) ;
    This chapter discusses the audit, preparation and presentation of company financial statements in Ireland. Legal regulations affecting the preparation of financial statements and affecting the conduct of audits are summarized. The institutional background to these activities is also discussed. The financial statements of one of Ireland’s largest public limited companies, CRH plc, are included at the end of this chapter and are referred to in the text where relevant.
      143