Now showing 1 - 7 of 7
  • Publication
    REST mediates resolution of HIF-dependent gene expression in prolonged hypoxia
    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key regulator of the cellular response to hypoxia which promotes oxygen delivery and metabolic adaptation to oxygen deprivation. However, the degree and duration of HIF-1a expression in hypoxia must be carefully balanced within cells in order to avoid unwanted side effects associated with excessive activity. The expression of HIF-1a mRNA is suppressed in prolonged hypoxia, suggesting that the control of HIF1A gene transcription is tightly regulated by negative feedback mechanisms. Little is known about the resolution of the HIF-1a protein response and the suppression of HIF-1a mRNA in prolonged hypoxia. Here, we demonstrate that the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) binds to the HIF-1a promoter in a hypoxia-dependent manner. Knockdown of REST using RNAi increases the expression of HIF-1a mRNA, protein and transcriptional activity. Furthermore REST knockdown increases glucose consumption and lactate production in a HIF-1a- (but not HIF-2a-) dependent manner. Finally, REST promotes the resolution of HIF-1a protein expression in prolonged hypoxia. In conclusion, we hypothesize that REST represses transcription of HIF-1a in prolonged hypoxia, thus contributing to the resolution of the HIF-1a response.
      286Scopus© Citations 54
  • Publication
    Nonlinear signalling networks and cell-to-cell variability transform external signals into broadly distributed or bimodal responses
    We show theoretically and experimentally a mechanism behind the emergence of wide or bimodal protein distributions in biochemical networks with nonlinear input–output characteristics (the dose–response curve) and variability in protein abundance. Large cell-to-cell variation in the nonlinear dose–response characteristics can be beneficial to facilitate two distinct groups of response levels as opposed to a graded response. Under the circumstances that we quantify mathematically, the two distinct responses can coexist within a cellular population, leading to the emergence of a bimodal protein distribution. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate the appearance of wide distributions in the hypoxia-inducible factor-mediated response network in HCT116 cells. With help of our theoretical framework, we perform a novel calculation of the magnitude of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in the dose–response obtained experimentally.
      454Scopus© Citations 21
  • Publication
    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) network: insights from mathematical models
    (Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.), 2013) ; ;
    Oxygen is a crucial molecule for cellular function. When oxygen demand exceeds supply, the oxygen sensing pathway centred on the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is switched on and promotes adaptation to hypoxia by up-regulating genes involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis and glycolysis. The regulation of HIF is tightly modulated through intricate regulatory mechanisms. Notably, its protein stability is controlled by the oxygen sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) enzymes and its transcriptional activity is controlled by the asparaginyl hydroxylase FIH (factor inhibiting HIF-1). To probe the complexity of hypoxia-induced HIF signalling, efforts in mathematical modelling of the pathway have been underway for around a decade. In this paper, we review the existing mathematical models developed to describe and explain specific behaviours of the HIF pathway and how they have contributed new insights into our understanding of the network. Topics for modelling included the switch-like response to decreased oxygen gradient, the role of micro environmental factors, the regulation by FIH and the temporal dynamics of the HIF response. We will also discuss the technical aspects, extent and limitations of these models. Recently, HIF pathway has been implicated in other disease contexts such as hypoxic inflammation and cancer through crosstalking with pathways like NFκB and mTOR. We will examine how future mathematical modelling and simulation of interlinked networks can aid in understanding HIF behaviour in complex pathophysiological situations. Ultimately this would allow the identification of new pharmacological targets in different disease settings.
      336Scopus© Citations 53
  • Publication
    Three-factor models versus time series models: quantifying time-dependencies of interactions between stimuli in cell biology and psychobiology for short longitudinal data
    Signal integration determines cell fate on the cellular level, affects cognitive processes and affective responses on the behavioural level, and is likely to be involved in psychoneurobiological processes underlying mood disorders. Interactions between stimuli may subjected to time effects. Time-dependencies of interactions between stimuli typically lead to complex cell responses and complex responses on the behavioural level. We show that both three-factor models and time series models can be used to uncover such time-dependencies. However, we argue that for short longitudinal data the three factor modelling approach is more suitable. In order to illustrate both approaches, we re-analysed previously published short longitudinal data sets. We found that in human embryonic kidney 293 cells cells the interaction effect in the regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 signalling activation by insulin and epidermal growth factor is subjected to a time effect and dramatically decays at peak values of ERK activation. In contrast, we found that the interaction effect induced by hypoxia and tumour necrosis factoralpha for the transcriptional activity of the human cyclo-oxygenase-2 promoter in HEK293 cells is time invariant at least in the first 12-h time window after stimulation. Furthermore, we applied the three-factor model to previously reported animal studies. In these studies, memory storage was found to be subjected to an interaction effect of the beta-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol and certain antagonists acting on the alpha-1-adrenoceptor / glucocorticoid-receptor system. Our model-based analysis suggests that only if the antagonist drug is administer in a critical time window, then the interaction effect is relevant.
      402
  • Publication
    Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling
    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.
      445Scopus© Citations 8
  • Publication
    Regulation of IL-1β-induced NF-κB by hydroxylases links key hypoxic and inflammatory signaling pathways
    Hypoxia is a prominent feature of chronically inflamed tissues. Oxygen-sensing hydroxylases control transcriptional adaptation to hypoxia through the regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), both of which can regulate the inflammatory response. Furthermore, pharmacologic hydroxylase inhibitors reduce inflammation in multiple animal models. However, the underlying mechanism(s) linking hydroxylase activity to inflammatory signaling remains unclear. IL-1β, a major proinflammatory cytokine that regulates NF-κB, is associated with multiple inflammatory pathologies. We demonstrate that a combination of prolyl hydroxylase 1 and factor inhibiting HIF hydroxylase isoforms regulates IL-1β-induced NF-κB at the level of (or downstream of) the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 complex. Multiple proteins of the distal IL-1β-signaling pathway are subject to hydroxylation and form complexes with either prolyl hydroxylase 1 or factor inhibiting HIF. Thus, we hypothesize that hydroxylases regulate IL-1β signaling and subsequent inflammatory gene expression. Furthermore, hydroxylase inhibition represents a unique approach to the inhibition of IL-1β-dependent inflammatory signaling.
      276Scopus© Citations 145
  • Publication
    REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor
    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia.
      362Scopus© Citations 55