Now showing 1 - 10 of 40
  • Publication
    Flexible working time arrangements in Ireland
    (University College Dublin. School of Social Justice, 2009-03) ;
    Commissioned by the EU Directorate-General Employment and Social Affairs, Unit G1 'equality between woment and men'
      2050
  • Publication
    Review of Ireland's Employment Policy from a Gender Perspective
    (Enege and the European Commission DG Justice and Consumers, 2015-02)
    European comparative data for Ireland reveals important features of the changing situation. Men’s unemployment rates are falling faster than women’s in Ireland. The unemployment rate (25-74) for men has fallen from 15.7% in 2012 to 13.5% in 2013 and 11.6% in 2014. On the contrary women’s unemployment rate (25-74) has dropped only slightly from 9.3% in 2012 to 9.2% in 2013 and 8.2% in 2014. As a result, the gender gap closed from 6.4p.p.to 4.3p.p. to 3.4p.p. in 2014 ranking Ireland 1st in the EU with the widest gender gap in unemployment (25-74). The EU-28 average was 8.8% for men and 9.2% for women in 2014 with a gender gap of -0.4p.p. Ireland stands out with its severe underrepresentation of women in national political structures. Only 16% of those in national parliament and 24% of those in national administration are women compared to EU-28 average of 29% in parliament and 40% in administration, ranking Ireland extremely low at 25th in the national administration and 23rd in the national parliament in 2015. A key reason, it can be argued, for the lack of priority placed on care provision is this chronic lack of representation of women in the decision-making system. One notable change is in the representation of women in national government (senior ministers) that increased from 13% to 27% between 2013 and 3Q2015, a rate that now ranks Ireland 15th with the EU-28 average at 27%.
      157
  • Publication
    Gender perspective on the economic crisis: Ireland in an EU context
    (University of Michigan, 2014-12)
    This article asks to what extent there are common gender dimensions to the austerity policies that have been pursued in Ireland, and across the EU, throughout the economic crisis years. While focusing on the Irish experience in particular, a comparative perspective is used, drawing on analyses of core policies at EU level and exploring the gender patterns evident in the way in which economic and social policies have been developed and implemented. Evidence is presented of the disproportionate impact in Ireland of cuts in public expenditure on low-income households, lone parents, and unemployed households, and the way in which resources to care services have been de-prioritized. A detailed analysis of the gendered impact of the crisis in Ireland is seen to reinforce patterns that have been identified at global and EU levels. Consequences of decisions and choices made and their implications for gender equality and social inequality are examined, particularly the dismantling of equality legislative and policy infrastructure. Despite some important redistributive effects of social protection policies, new inequalities are revealed in inter-generational impacts of the crisis, which have received little attention, and are reflected in housing costs, negative labour market flexibility, a two-tier public sector, and emigration. The re-establishment of employment growth and other definite signs of recovery are unlikely to reverse the deepened inequalities that have marked this crisis, unless policies are radically changed.
      906
  • Publication
    Elderly care in Ireland - provisions and providers
    (University College Dublin. School of Social Justice, 2010-04) ;
      31983
  • Publication
    Work-life balance : The Irish National Report
    (University College Dublin. School of Social Justice, 2005-03) ; ;
    External report commissioned by and presented to the EU Directorate-General Employment and Social Affairs, Unit G1 'Equality between Women and Men'
      1326
  • Publication
    Discourses on Foetal Rights and Women's Embodiment
    (Cork University Press, 2015-10)
    This chapter focuses on the changing discourses on foetal rights in Ireland, and internationally, and the consequences for women's embodiment. Court cases and court decisions are explored with a particular emphasis on new interpretations of foetal rights and their implications for women's bodily integrity and autonomy.
      478
  • Publication
    National expert assessment of The National Reform Programme 2012
    (European Commission, 2012-05-10)
    This Report was prepared for the EU Network on Gender Equality and Employment and focuses on the impact on women and men of the current economic crisis and particularly the economic and social policies that have been implemented between 2008 and 2012 and their impact on gender equality.
      203
  • Publication
    Changing Economic and Social Worlds of Irish Women
    (New Island Books, 2008-02-25)
    We have just lived through a decade of enormous change in the economic and social position of Irish women. From a traditional position in which the majority of women were carers - unpaid carers - women now occupy the dual role of carer-earner. The majority of women are now in paid employment, including women with children, married women and a significant proportion of women lone parents. This has meant huge changes in women's lives, changes which have been brought about by the decisions and choices of thousands of individual women, despite the lack of policies or support systems to facilitate such change. This chapter explores some of the key aspects of the economic and social policy frameworks that shape, and sometimes determine, the changing patterns of Irish women's lives.
      173