Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Flip Side of the Pollution Haven: Do Export Destinations Matter?
    (University College Dublin. School of Economics, 2011-01)
    This paper looks at a reverse side of the pollution haven argument by answering a question on whether environmental regulations of the destination, rather than source countries play a role. The study utilises a firm-level dataset with aggregate export destinations of Europe and rest of the world (ROW) to establish whether a firm adjusts its energy use in response to a decision to start exporting to a more (Europe) or a less (ROW) regulated destination. Although on average, no energy adjustments are found for these destinations, focusing on the most polluting industries or the most energy-intensive firms reveals that fi rms' decision to start exporting to Europe brings about signi ficant energy improvements, unlike a decision to start exporting to the ROW. Further estimations suggest that no adjustments found for firms exporting to the ROW are consistent with exporting to non-OECD region.
      180
  • Publication
    Is there an environmental benefit to being an exporter? Evidence from firm level data
    (University College Dublin. School of Economics, 2010-03) ;
    One of the greatest concerns over globalisation is its impact on the environment. This paper contributes to this debate by analysing the consequences of becoming an exporter on a firm's energy consumption. We show both theoretically and empirically that for low fuel intensity firms exporting status is associated with higher fuel consumption while for high fuel intensity firms exporting is results in decreased fuel consumption. Further analysis reveals that higher fuel consumption of low fuel intensity firms occurs after exporting, perhaps as a response to increased production. In contrast, firms using relatively large quantities of fuel decrease their energy use after exporting, perhaps by adopting more fuel-effcient technology. These results indicate that the use of aggregate data, as is the case in almost all studies of trade and the environment, is likely to conceal important connections between the two.
      674