Now showing 1 - 8 of 8
  • Publication
    Lower extremity coordination and symmetry patterns during a drop vertical jump task following acute ankle sprain
    Purpose: Evaluate the potentially adaptive movement patterns associated with acute lateral ankle sprain (LAS) using biomechanical analyzes. Methods: Thirty participants with acute LAS and nineteen controls performed a drop vertical jump (DVJ) task. 3D kinematic and sagittal plane kinetic profiles were plotted for the hip, knee and ankle joints of both limbs for the drop jump (phase 1) and drop landing (phase 2) phases of the DVJ. Inter-limb symmetry and the rate of force development (RFD) relative to bodyweight (BW) during both phases of the DVJ were also determined. Results: The LAS group displayed reduced ankle plantar-flexion on their injured limb during phase 2 of the DVJ, with greater associated inter-limb asymmetry for this movement (p < .05). The LAS group also displayed altered kinetic profiles, with increased inter-limb hip asymmetry for both phases of the DVJ (p < .05). This was associated with a decrease in the LAS participants’ injured limb RFD during phase 2 of the DVJ when compared with that of controls (11.76 ± 3.43 BW/s vs 14.60 ± 3.20 BW/s; p = .01, η2 = 0.14). Conclusion: Participants with LAS display potentially aberrant coordination strategies during a DVJ as evidenced by an increased dependence on the non-injured limb.
      943Scopus© Citations 26
  • Publication
    Inter-joint coordination strategies during unilateral stance 6-months following first-time lateral ankle sprain
    Background: Longitudinal analyses of participants with a history of lateral ankle sprain are lacking. This investigation combined measures of inter-joint coordination and stabilometry to evaluate eyes-open (condition 1) and eyes-closed (condition 2) static unilateral stance performance in a group of participants, 6-months after they sustained an acute, first-time lateral ankle sprain in comparison to a control group. Methods: Sixty-nine participants with a 6-month history of first-time lateral ankle sprain and 20 non-injured controls completed three 20-second unilateral stance task trials in conditions 1 and 2. An adjusted coefficient of multiple determination statistic was used to compare stance limb 3-dimensional kinematic data for similarity in the aim of establishing patterns of lower-limb inter-joint coordination. The fractal dimension of the stance limb centre of pressure path was also calculated. Findings: Between-group analyses revealed significant differences in stance limb inter-joint coordination strategies for conditions 1 and 2, and in the fractal dimension of the centre-of-pressure path for condition 2 only. Injured participants displayed increases in ankle–hip linked coordination compared to controls in condition 1 (sagittal/frontal plane: 0.15 [0.14] vs 0.06 [0.04]; η2 = .19; sagittal/transverse plane: 0.14 [0.11] vs 0.09 [0.05]; η2 = 0.14) and condition 2 (sagittal/frontal plane: 0.15 [0.12] vs 0.08 [0.06]; η2 = 0.23), with an associated decrease in the fractal dimension of the centre-of-pressure path (injured limb: 1.23 [0.13] vs 1.36 [0.13]; η2 = 0.20). Interpretation: Participants with a 6-month history of first-time lateral ankle sprain exhibit a hip-dominant coordination strategy for static unilateral stance compared to non-injured controls.
      528Scopus© Citations 17
  • Publication
    Rehabilitation exercise assessment using inertial sensors: a cross-sectional analytical study
    Background: Accurate assessments of adherence and exercise performance are required in order to ensure that patients adhere to and perform their rehabilitation exercises correctly within the home environment. Inertial sensors have previously been advocated as a means of achieving these requirements, by using them as an input to an exercise biofeedback system. This research sought to investigate whether inertial sensors, and in particular a single sensor, can accurately classify exercise performance in patients performing lower limb exercises for rehabilitation purposes. Methods:Fifty-eight participants (19 male, 39 female, age: 53.9 +/- 8.5 years, height: 1.69 +/- 0.08 m, weight: 74.3 +/- 13.0 kg) performed ten repetitions of seven lower limb exercises (hip abduction, hip flexion, hip extension, knee extension, heel slide, straight leg raise, and inner range quadriceps). Three inertial sensor units, secured to the thigh, shin and foot of the leg being exercised, were used to acquire data during each exercise. Machine learning classification methods were applied to quantify the acquired data. Results:The classification methods achieved relatively high accuracy at distinguishing between correct and incorrect performance of an exercise using three, two, or one sensor while moderate efficacy scores were also achieved by the classifier when attempting to classify the particular error in exercise performance. Results also illustrated that a reduction in the number of inertial sensor units employed has little effect on the overall efficacy results. Conclusion:The results revealed that it is possible to classify lower limb exercise performance using inertial sensors with satisfactory levels of accuracy and reducing the number of sensors employed does not reduce the accuracy of the method
      316Scopus© Citations 91
  • Publication
    The Use of Inertial Sensors for the Classification of Rehabilitation Exercises
    The benefits of exercise in rehabilitation after orthopaedic surgery or following a musculoskeletal injury has been widely established. Within a hospital or clinical environment, adherence levels to rehabilitation exercise programs are high due to the supervision of the patient during the rehabilitation process. However, adherence levels drop significantly when patients are asked to perform the program at home. This paper describes the use of simple inertial sensors for the purpose of developing a biofeedback system to monitor adherence to rehabilitation programs. The results show that a single sensor can accurately distinguish between seven commonly prescribed rehabilitation exercises with accuracies between 93% and 95%. Results also show that the use of multiple sensor units does not significantly improve results therefore suggesting that a single sensor unit can be used as an input to an exercise biofeedback system.
      564Scopus© Citations 18
  • Publication
    Analysing Fatigue in Chronic Ankle Instability [Poster Presentation]
    Lateral ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries suffered by athletes in sports. It is estimated that an upwards of 70% of athletes will develop chronic ankle instability following an initial sprain. Despite the high prevalence of CAI, knowledge of the mechanism or prevention of repeated ankle sprains is limited . Since most sprains occur in the latter halves of matches, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of fatigue on lower limb movement variability in individuals with and without CAI during running gait using 3D inertial sensors
      121
  • Publication
    Lower Limb Interjoint Postural Coordination One Year after First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain
    Introduction: Longitudinal analyses of participants with a history of lateral ankle sprain are lacking. This investigation combined measures of lower limb interjoint coordination and stabilometry to evaluate static unipedal stance with the eyes open (condition 1) and closed (condition 2) in a group of participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI) compared to lateral ankle sprain ‘‘copers’’ (both recruited 12 months after sustaining an acute first-time lateral ankle sprain) and a group of noninjured controls. Methods: Twenty-eight participants with CAI, 42 lateral ankle sprain ‘‘copers,’’ and 20 noninjured controls completed three 20-s singlelimb stance trials in conditions 1 and 2. An adjusted coefficient of multiple determination statistic was used to compare stance limb threedimensional kinematic data for similarity to establish patterns of interjoint coordination. The fractal dimension of the stance limb center of pressure path was also calculated. Results: Between-group analyses revealed that participants with CAI displayed notable increases in ankle–hip linked coordination compared with both lateral ankle sprain ‘‘copers’’ (j0.52 (1.05) vs 0.28 (0.9), P = 0.007) and controls (j0.52 (1.05) vs 0.63 (0.64), P = 0.006) in condition 1 and compared with controls only (0.62 (1.92) vs 0.1 (1.0) P = 0.002) in condition 2. Participants with CAI also exhibited a decrease in the fractal dimension of the center-of-pressure path during condition 2 compared with both controls and lateral ankle sprain ‘‘copers.’’ Conclusions: Participants with CAI present with a hip-dominant strategy of eyes-open and eyes-closed static unipedal stance. This coincided with reduced complexity of the stance limb center of pressure path in the eyes-closed condition.
      469Scopus© Citations 20
  • Publication
    An Ambulatory Method of Identifying Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Gait Patterns
    The use of inertial sensors to characterize pathological gait has traditionally been based on the calculation of temporal and spatial gait variables from inertial sensor data. This approach has proved successful in the identification of gait deviations in populations where substantial differences from normal gait patterns exist; such as in Parkinsonian gait. However, it is not currently clear if this approach could identify more subtle gait deviations, such as those associated with musculoskeletal injury. This study investigates whether additional analysis of inertial sensor data, based on quantification of gyroscope features of interest, would provide further discriminant capability in this regard. The tested cohort consisted of a group of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) females and a group of non-injured female controls, each performed ten walking trials. Gait performance was measured simultaneously using inertial sensors and an optoelectronic marker based system. The ACL-R group displayed kinematic and kinetic deviations from the control group, but no temporal or spatial deviations. This study demonstrates that quantification of gyroscope features can successfully identify changes associated with ACL-R gait, which was not possible using spatial or temporal variables. This finding may also have a role in other clinical applications where small gait deviations exist.
      400Scopus© Citations 40
  • Publication
    Coordination and symmetry patterns during the drop vertical jump, 6-months after first-time lateral ankle sprain
    To evaluate the adaptive movement and motor control patterns of a group with a 6-month history of first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury during a drop vertical jump (DVJ) task. Fifty-one participants with a 6-month history of first-time acute LAS injury and twenty controls performed a DVJ task. 3D kinematic and sagittal plane kinetic profiles were plotted for the lower extremity joints of both limbs for the drop jump (phase 1) and drop landing (phase 2) phases of the DVJ. Inter-limb symmetry and the rate of impact modulation (RIM) relative to bodyweight (BW) during both phases of the DVJ were also determined. LAS participants displayed bilateral increases in knee flexion and an increase in ankle inversion during phases 1 and 2, respectively. They also displayed reduced ankle plantar flexion on their injured limb during both phases of the DVJ (p < 0.05); increased inter-limb asymmetry of RIM was noted for both phases of the DVJ, while the moment-of-force profile exhibited bilaterally greater hip extensor dominance during phase 1. Participants with a 6-month history of first-time LAS display some movement patterns consistent with those observed in chronic ankle instability populations during similar tasks.
      516Scopus© Citations 23