Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Publication
    An Integrated Global Analysis of Compartmentalized HRAS Signaling
    Modern omics technologies allow us to obtain global information on different types of biological networks. However, integrating these different types of analyses into a coherent framework for a comprehensive biological interpretation remains challenging. Here, we present a conceptual framework that integrates protein interaction, phosphoproteomics, and transcriptomics data. Applying this method to analyze HRAS signaling from different subcellular compartments shows that spatially defined networks contribute specific functions to HRAS signaling. Changes in HRAS protein interactions at different sites lead to different kinase activation patterns that differentially regulate gene transcription. HRAS-mediated signaling is the strongest from the cell membrane, but it regulates the largest number of genes from the endoplasmic reticulum. The integrated networks provide a topologically and functionally resolved view of HRAS signaling. They reveal distinct HRAS functions including the control of cell migration from the endoplasmic reticulum and TP53-dependent cell survival when signaling from the Golgi apparatus.
    Scopus© Citations 32  444
  • Publication
    The spatiotemporal regulation of RAS signalling
    (Portland Press, 2016-10-19) ; ;
    Nearly 30% of human tumours harbour mutations in RAS family members. Post-translational modifications and the localisation of RAS within subcellular compartments affect RAS interactions with regulator, effector and scaffolding proteins. New insights into the control of spatiotemporal RAS signalling reveal that activation kinetics and subcellular compartmentalisation are tightly coupled to the generation of specific biological outcomes. Computational modelling can help utilising these insights for the identification of new targets and design of new therapeutic approaches.
      410Scopus© Citations 17
  • Publication
    Characterisation of HRas local signal transduction networks using engineered site-specific exchange factors
    Ras GTPases convey signals from different types of membranes. At these locations, different Ras isoforms, interactors and regulators generate different biochemical signals and biological outputs. The study of Ras localisation-specific signal transduction networks has been hampered by our inability to specifically activate each of these Ras pools. Here, we describe a new set of site-specific tethered exchange factors, engineered by fusing the RasGRF1 CDC25 domain to sub-localisation-defining cues, whereby Ras pools at specific locations can be precisely activated. We show that the CDC25 domain has a high specificity for activating HRas but not NRas and KRas. This unexpected finding means that our constructs mainly activate endogenous HRas. Hence, their use enabled us to identify distinct pathways regulated by HRas in endomembranes and plasma membrane microdomains. Importantly, these new constructs unveil different patterns of HRas activity specified by their subcellular localisation. Overall, the targeted GEFs described herein constitute ideal tools for dissecting spatially-defined HRas biochemical and biological functions.
      414Scopus© Citations 8
  • Publication
    Substrate-Trapped Interactors of PHD3 and FIH Cluster in Distinct Signaling Pathways
    Amino acid hydroxylation is a post-translational modification that regulates intra- and inter-molecular protein-protein interactions. The modifications are regulated by a family of 2-oxoglutarate- (2OG) dependent enzymes and, although the biochemistry is well understood, until now only a few substrates have been described for these enzymes. Using quantitative interaction proteomics, we screened for substrates of the proline hydroxylase PHD3 and the asparagine hydroxylase FIH, which regulate the HIF-mediated hypoxic response. We were able to identify hundreds of potential substrates. Enrichment analysis revealed that the potential substrates of both hydroxylases cluster in the same pathways but frequently modify different nodes of signaling networks. We confirm that two proteins identified in our screen, MAPK6 (Erk3) and RIPK4, are indeed hydroxylated in a FIH- or PHD3-dependent mechanism. We further determined that FIH-dependent hydroxylation regulates RIPK4-dependent Wnt signaling, and that PHD3-dependent hydroxylation of MAPK6 protects the protein from proteasomal degradation.
      293Scopus© Citations 67
  • Publication
    Mitogen-Inducible Gene-6 Mediates Feedback Inhibition from Mutated BRAF towards the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Thereby Limits Malignant Transformation
    BRAF functions in the RAS-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. Activation of this pathway is necessary to mediate the transforming potential of oncogenic BRAF, however, it may also cause a negative feedback that inhibits the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Mitogen-inducible gene-6 (MIG-6) is a potent inhibitor of the EGFR and has been demonstrated to function as a tumor suppressor. As MIG-6 can be induced via RAS-ERK signaling, we investigated its potential involvement in this negative regulatory loop. Focus formation assays were performed and demonstrated that MIG-6 significantly reduces malignant transformation induced by oncogenic BRAF. Although this genetic interaction was mirrored by a physical interaction between MIG-6 and BRAF, we did not observe a direct regulation of BRAF kinase activity by MIG-6. Interestingly, a selective chemical EGFR inhibitor suppressed transformation to a similar degree as MIG-6, whereas combining these approaches had no synergistic effect. By analyzing a range of BRAF mutated and wildtype cell line models, we could show that BRAF V600E causes a strong upregulation of MIG-6, which was mediated at the transcriptional level via the RAS-ERK pathway and resulted in downregulation of EGFR activation. This feedback loop is operational in tumors, as shown by the analysis of almost 400 patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Presence of BRAF V600E correlated with increased MIG-6 expression on the one hand, and with inactivation of the EGFR and of PI3K/AKT signaling on the other hand. Importantly, we also observed a more aggressive disease phenotype when BRAF V600E coexisted with low MIG-6 expression. Finally, analysis of methylation data was performed and revealed that higher methylation of MIG-6 correlated to its decreased expression. Taken together, we demonstrate that MIG-6 efficiently reduces cellular transformation driven by oncogenic BRAF by orchestrating a negative feedback circuit directed towards the EGFR.
      276Scopus© Citations 7