Now showing 1 - 10 of 25
  • Publication
    A mixture of experts model for rank data with applications in election studies
    (Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2008-12) ;
    A voting bloc is defined to be a group of voters who have similar voting preferences. The cleavage of the Irish electorate into voting blocs is of interest. Irish elections employ a 'single transferable vote' electoral system; under this system voters rank some or all of the electoral candidates in order of preference. These rank votes provide a rich source of preference information from which inferences about the composition of the electorate may be drawn. Additionally, the influence of social factors or covariates on the electorate composition is of interest. A mixture of experts model is a mixture model in which the model parameters are functions of covariates. A mixture of experts model for rank data is developed to provide a model-based method to cluster Irish voters into voting blocs, to examine the influence of social factors on this clustering and to examine the characteristic preferences of the voting blocs. The Benter model for rank data is employed as the family of component densities within the mixture of experts model; generalized linear model theory is employed to model the influence of covariates on the mixing proportions. Model fitting is achieved via a hybrid of the EM and MM algorithms. An example of the methodology is illustrated by examining an Irish presidential election. The existence of voting blocs in the electorate is established and it is determined that age and government satisfaction levels are important factors in influencing voting in this election.
      280Scopus© Citations 78
  • Publication
    MetSizeR: selecting the optimal sample size for metabolomic studies using an analysis based approach
    Background: Determining sample sizes for metabolomic experiments is important but due to the complexity of these experiments, there are currently no standard methods for sample size estimation in metabolomics. Since pilot studies are rarely done in metabolomics, currently existing sample size estimation approaches which rely on pilot data can not be applied. Results: In this article, an analysis based approach called MetSizeR is developed to estimate sample size for metabolomic experiments even when experimental pilot data are not available. The key motivation for MetSizeR is that it considers the type of analysis the researcher intends to use for data analysis when estimating sample size. MetSizeR uses information about the data analysis technique and prior expert knowledge of the metabolomic experiment to simulate pilot data from a statistical model. Permutation based techniques are then applied to the simulated pilot data to estimate the required sample size. Conclusions: The MetSizeR methodology, and a publicly available software package which implements the approach, are illustrated through real metabolomic applications. Sample size estimates, informed by the intended statistical analysis technique, and the associated uncertainty are provided.
      286Scopus© Citations 76
  • Publication
    A dynamic probabilistic principal components model for the analysis of longitudinal metabolomics data
    In a longitudinal metabolomics study, multiple metabolites are measured from several observations at many time points. Interest lies in reducing the dimensionality of such data and in highlighting influential metabolites which change over time. A dynamic probabilistic principal components analysis model is proposed to achieve dimension reduction while appropriately modelling the correlation due to repeated measurements. This is achieved by assuming an auto-regressive model for some of the model parameters. Linear mixed models are subsequently used to identify influential metabolites which change over time. The model proposed is used to analyse data from a longitudinal metabolomics animal study.
      614Scopus© Citations 17
  • Publication
    Mixed membership models for rank data: Investigating structure in Irish voting data
    A mixed membership model is an individual level mixture model where individuals have partial membership of the profiles (or groups) that characterize a population. A mixed membership model for rank data is outlined and illustrated through the analysis of voting in the 2002 Irish general election. This particular election uses a voting system called proportional representation using a single transferable vote (PR-STV) where voters rank some or all of the candidates in order of preference. The data set considered consists of all votes in a constituency from the 2002 Irish general election. Interest lies in highlighting distinct voting profiles within the electorate and studying how voters affiliate themselves to these voting profiles. The mixed membership model for rank data is fitted to the voting data and is shown to give a concise and highly interpretable explanation of voting patterns in this election.
      288
  • Publication
    Mixtures of Experts Models
    Mixtures of experts models provide a framework in which covariates may be included in mixture models. This is achieved by modelling the parameters of the mixture model as functions of the concomitant covariates. Given their mixture model foundation, mixtures of experts models possess a diverse range of analytic uses, from clustering observations to capturing parameter heterogeneity in cross-sectional data. This chapter focuses on delineating the mixture of experts modelling framework and demonstrates the utility and flexibility of mixtures of experts models as an analytic tool.
      364
  • Publication
    Combining biomarker and food intake data
    Recent developments in biomarker discovery have demonstrated that combining biomarkers with self-reported intake data has the potential to improve estimation of food intake. Here, statistical methods for combining biomarker and self-reported food intake data are discussed. The calibration equations method is a widely applied method that corrects for measurement error in self-reported food intake data through the use of biomarker data. The method is outlined and illustrated through an example where citrus intake is estimated. In order to estimate stable calibration equations, a simulation-based framework is delineated which estimates the percentage of study subjects from whom biomarker data is required. The method of triads is frequently used to assess the validity of self-reported food intake data by combining it with biomarker data. The method is outlined and sensitivity to its underlying assumptions is illustrated through simulation studies.
      20
  • Publication
    Clustering ranked preference data using sociodemographic covariates
    Ranked preference data arise when a set of judges rank, in order of their preference, a set of objects. Such data arise in preferential voting systems and market research surveys. Covariate data associated with the judges are also often recorded. Such covariate data should be used in conjunction with preference data when drawing inferences about judges. To cluster a population of judges, the population is modelled as a collection of homogeneous groups. The Plackett-Luce model for ranked data is employed to model a judge’s ranked preferences within a group. A mixture of Plackett-Luce models is employed to model the population of judges, where each component in the mixture represents a group of judges. Mixture of experts models provide a framework in which covariates are included in mixture models. Covariates are included through the mixing proportions and the component density parameters. A mixture of experts model for ranked preference data is developed by combining a mixture of experts model and a mixture of Plackett-Luce models. Particular attention is given to the manner in which covariates enter the model. The mixing proportions and group specific parameters are potentially dependent on covariates. Model selection procedures are employed to choose optimal models. Model parameters are estimated via the ‘EMM algorithm’, a hybrid of the Expectation-Maximization and the Minorization-Maximization algorithms. Examples are provided through a menu survey and through Irish election data. Results indicate mixture modelling using covariates is insightful when examining a population of judges who express preferences.
      601
  • Publication
    Probabilistic principal component analysis for metabolomic data
    Background: Data from metabolomic studies are typically complex and high-dimensional. Principal component analysis (PCA) is currently the most widely used statistical technique for analyzing metabolomic data. However, PCA is limited by the fact that it is not based on a statistical model. Results: Here, probabilistic principal component analysis (PPCA) which addresses some of the limitations of PCA, is reviewed and extended. A novel extension of PPCA, called probabilistic principal component and covariates analysis (PPCCA), is introduced which provides a flexible approach to jointly model metabolomic data and additional covariate information. The use of a mixture of PPCA models for discovering the number of inherent groups in metabolomic data is demonstrated. The jackknife technique is employed to construct confidence intervals for estimated model parameters throughout. The optimal number of principal components is determined through the use of the Bayesian Information Criterion model selection tool, which is modified to address the high dimensionality of the data. Conclusions: The methods presented are illustrated through an application to metabolomic data sets. Jointly modeling metabolomic data and covariates was successfully achieved and has the potential to provide deeper insight to the underlying data structure. Examination of confidence intervals for the model parameters, such as loadings, allows for principled and clear interpretation of the underlying data structure. A software package called MetabolAnalyze, freely available through the R statistical software, has been developed to facilitate implementation of the presented methods in the metabolomics field.
      344Scopus© Citations 95
  • Publication
    BINDER: computationally inferring a gene regulatory network for Mycobacterium abscessus
    Background: Although many of the genic features in Mycobacterium abscessus have been fully validated, a comprehensive understanding of the regulatory elements remains lacking. Moreover, there is little understanding of how the organism regulates its transcriptomic profile, enabling cells to survive in hostile environments. Here, to computationally infer the gene regulatory network for Mycobacterium abscessus we propose a novel statistical computational modelling approach: BayesIan gene regulatory Networks inferreD via gene coExpression and compaRative genomics (BINDER). In tandem with derived experimental coexpression data, the property of genomic conservation is exploited to probabilistically infer a gene regulatory network in Mycobacterium abscessus.Inference on regulatory interactions is conducted by combining ‘primary’ and ‘auxiliary’ data strata. The data forming the primary and auxiliary strata are derived from RNA-seq experiments and sequence information in the primary organism Mycobacterium abscessus as well as ChIP-seq data extracted from a related proxy organism Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The primary and auxiliary data are combined in a hierarchical Bayesian framework, informing the apposite bivariate likelihood function and prior distributions respectively. The inferred relationships provide insight to regulon groupings in Mycobacterium abscessus. Results: We implement BINDER on data relating to a collection of 167,280 regulator-target pairs resulting in the identification of 54 regulator-target pairs, across 5 transcription factors, for which there is strong probability of regulatory interaction. Conclusions: The inferred regulatory interactions provide insight to, and a valuable resource for further studies of, transcriptional control in Mycobacterium abscessus, and in the family of Mycobacteriaceae more generally. Further, the developed BINDER framework has broad applicability, useable in settings where computational inference of a gene regulatory network requires integration of data sources derived from both the primary organism of interest and from related proxy organisms.
      210Scopus© Citations 4