Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Making automated multiple alignments of very large numbers of protein sequences
    (Oxford University Press, 2013-02-21) ; ; ;
    Motivation: Recent developments in sequence alignment software have made possible multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) of >100 000 sequences in reasonable times. At present, there are no systematic analyses concerning the scalability of the alignment quality as the number of aligned sequences is increased. Results: We benchmarked a wide range of widely used MSA packages using a selection of protein families with some known structures and found that the accuracy of such alignments decreases markedly as the number of sequences grows. This is more or less true of all packages and protein families. The phenomenon is mostly due to the accumulation of alignment errors, rather than problems in guide-tree construction. This is partly alleviated by using iterative refinement or selectively adding sequences. The average accuracy of progressive methods by comparison with structure-based benchmarks can be improved by incorporating information derived from high-quality structural alignments of sequences with solved structures. This suggests that the availability of high quality curated alignments will have to complement algorithmic and/or software developments in the long-term.
      434Scopus© Citations 44
  • Publication
    Fast, scalable generation of high-quality protein multiple sequence alignments using Clustal Omega
    Multiple sequence alignments are fundamental to many sequence analysis methods. Most alignments are computed using the progressive alignment heuristic. These methods are starting to become a bottleneck in some analysis pipelines when faced with data sets of the size of many thousands of sequences. Some methods allow computation of larger data sets while sacrificing quality, and others produce high-quality alignments, but scale badly with the number of sequences. In this paper, we describe a new program called Clustal Omega, which can align virtually any number of protein sequences quickly and that delivers accurate alignments. The accuracy of the package on smaller test cases is similar to that of the high-quality aligners. On larger data sets, Clustal Omega outperforms other packages in terms of execution time and quality. Clustal Omega also has powerful features for adding sequences to and exploiting information in existing alignments, making use of the vast amount of precomputed information in public databases like Pfam.
      732Scopus© Citations 10556
  • Publication
    Sequence embedding for fast construction of guide trees for multiple sequence alignment
    The most widely used multiple sequence alignment methods require sequences to be clustered as an initial step. Most sequence clustering methods require a full distance matrix to be computed between all pairs of sequences. This requires memory and time proportional to N2 for N sequences. When N grows larger than 10,000 or so, this becomes increasingly prohibitive and can form a significant barrier to carrying out very large multiple alignments. In this paper, we have tested variations on a class of embedding methods that have been designed for clustering large numbers of complex objects where the individual distance calculations are expensive. These methods involve embedding the sequences in a space where the similarities within a set of sequences can be closely approximated without having to compute all pair-wise distances. We show how this approach greatly reduces computation time and memory requirements for clustering large numbers of sequences and demonstrate the quality of the clusterings by benchmarking them as guide trees for multiple alignment. Source code is available for download from http://www.clustal.org/mbed.tgz.
      333Scopus© Citations 88