Now showing 1 - 10 of 19
  • Publication
    Business model innovation: a temporal perspective
    Recent years have seen an explosion in the number of academic and practitioner-oriented publications on business models and business model innovation. Indeed, companies that traditionally focused on product and service innovation, are turning toward business model innovation as an alternative orcomplement to product or process innovation. Nevertheless, companies struggle to innovate the business models through which commercialisable new ideas and technologies will pass. At the same time, the literature remains skewed toward product and process innovation rather than business model innovation. This paper highlights the need for a temporal view of the business model innovation process and proposes a conceptual model of the business model innovation process to enable organisations to identify, model and prioritise potential business models. It also develops a prioritisation framework to be used for ranking alternative business models and to form part of an IT-based business model decision support system.
      317
  • Publication
    Advancing ISD Education Research with Bioecological Systems Theory
    (International Conference on Information Systems Development, 2018-08-24) ;
    The Information Systems (IS) community designs and delivers IS curricula in higher education and faces pedagogical challenges in teaching some complex and technical material. Many of us are involved in the design, implementation, evaluation, adoption, and use of IS to support education and training in academia and in industry. Yet IS research on education is often based on technologically deterministic assumptions about the impact of technology on education outcomes and involves narrowly focused studies on the use and impact of technology in education. In this paper, we introduce IS to Bioecological Theory (BET), whose insights have had a transformative effect in the field of developmental psychology but not well known in IS. We use BET to map existing literature on IS and Higher Education and also outline how this theory can be used in IS to inform the design of technological artifacts to support students’ learning processes.
      404
  • Publication
    A Clockwork Organisation: Proposing a New Theory of Organisational Temporality
    Time is an inherent quality of human life, yet it remains a hidden dimension in Information Systems (IS) research. In our 'real time' world, time has become a fundamentally important business performance indicator but the hidden costs associated with increased speed in firms are frequently overlooked. In research, there has been a lack of synthesis and coherence on the topic of time, largely because a reliance on myopic measures of time has resulted in a shortage of research on temporal construct associations. To address the conceptual weaknesses in studies of time, the aim of this research is to provide a rich definition and conceptualisation of time in an organisational context. Our framework of organisational temporal performance is based on a multidisciplinary literature review, where variants and sub-components of the concept have originated, matured, and have been applied and tested thoroughly over time. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of the study and possible avenues for future research.
      145
  • Publication
    Mind the Gaps: increasing the impact of IS research on ISD performance improvement
    (Australasian Association for Information Systems, 2015) ; ;
    Poor performance has pervaded the last forty years of software development, evident across industry sectors, project size, budget, geographic location, system quality and functionality, and exacerbated by increased criticality of IT in organizational mission and strategy. A significant body of research has investigated the potential of emerging development methodologies to address these shortcomings but the effectiveness of these methods is largely supported by anecdotal evidence. At the same time, metrics and measurement are known to affect ISD performance but the existing literature on ISD metrics is misaligned with practitioners’ needs, leading to a lack of clarity about ISD metrics in practice. This paper presents an interdisciplinary literature review on ISD metrics to identify the underlying reasons for this misalignment and evaluate the extent to which existing literature can be used to better understand the impact of emerging software development methodologies on ISD performance.
      498
  • Publication
    The Road Less Travelled: A New Perspective On Sustained Competitive Advantage Through Knowledge Creation
    Knowledge and intellectual capital have become the primary bases upon which organisations construct their core competencies and are increasingly seen as the key to superior organisational performance (Lubit, 2001). At the same time, both the need to and difficulty associated with developing sustainable competitive advantages are rapidly increasing (ibid.). This paper argues that two roads lead to sustained competitive advantage in firms. The well-travelled road is largely based on conceptualising knowledge in terms of information and data and attempting to leverage organisational knowledge by focusing on the management and utilisation of information in organisations. The road less travelled is based on recognising the power of knowledge in general, and knowledge creation in particular, to stimulate creativity and innovation in organisations leading to sustained competitive advantage. On this road, it is recognised that truly innovative organisations 'do not simply process information… they actually create new knowledge and information, from the inside out, in order to redefine both problems and solutions and, in the process, to re-create the environment' (Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995, p.56). Despite the promise of the road less travelled, existing perspectives on knowledge creation are beset with a variety of epistemological and methodological problems. This paper develops a new perspective on knowledge creation by delving into existing conceptualisations and classifications of knowledge in literature, exploring the philosophical assumptions upon which they are based, probing the conceptual and methodological issues that surround these views and articulating a new perspective on knowledge creation to guide future research efforts.
      193
  • Publication
    Harnessing the innovative potential of knowledge in the digital enterprise
    The open, flexible affordances of pervasive digital technologies have fundamentally altered the nature of organisational innovation. In the extreme, these technologies become platforms for digitally enacted organisational innovation. At its core, innovation is a process of creating and using new ideas and concepts. In the digital realm innovation becomes a process of enacted knowledge creation. This research contributes to a growing discourse on the relationship between innovation and knowledge creation by building and testing a hybrid model of organisational knowledge creation and innovation. Its findings illustrate the utility of using knowledge-based perspectives to investigate organisational innovation and have significant implications for fostering digital innovation in the firm.  
      205
  • Publication
    Designing the Future Perfect: Developing a temporal understanding of the intentionality and generativity of organisational practices
    (2015-09-15)
    According to Barbara Adam, 'time is such an obvious factor in social science that it is almost invisible'. Indeed, organisational researchers have relied upon taken-for-granted assumptions about the nature of time and have built theories that are frequently silent about the temporal nature of our being in the world. This paper addresses two key questions about time: (i) which formulation(s) of time are most useful in our research, and (ii) how might we use such formulations to build better theory? In addressing the first question, two main formulations of time are examined. The first is frequently associated with research in the natural sciences and relates time to the sense of passing time expressed in successive readings of the clock. The second is typically associated with research in the social sciences and relates time to the experience of purposive, intentional, goal-directed behaviour. In order to build better theory, organisational scholars are encouraged to identify and classify the formulations of time that underpin their research, to evaluate the fit between those temporal assumptions and the goals of their research, and to investigate the extent to theories that are based on different assumptions about time can be combined or integrated.
      126
  • Publication
    In search of lost time: investigating the temporality of student engagement, the role of learning technologies, and implications for student performance
    (2014-12-10)
    Much has been written about the importance of engaging students in the learning process. However, studies have shown that students today spend significantly less time on their studies than their forebears. Given the limitations of the existing body of knowledge, this study reviews what is currently known about full-time college students' time use and its consequences in terms of exam performance and skill acquisition. In particular, the results of our initial investigation suggest the ubiquity of today’s technologies, especially the Internet, has significant and frequently overlooked consequences for student engagement in general and for their consumption of content for learning in particular. Further, future studies are needed to unravel the complex relationship that exists between learning technologies, students' time use and their academic performance. The paper concludes by highlighting a number of possible avenues for future research in this area.
      271
  • Publication
    Virtual Worlds: S(t)imulating Creativity in Decision Making
    (Taylor and Francis, 2011-04) ;
    The significance of the earliest phase of decision making stems from the fact that decision makers 'frame' problems during this phase. These frames shape all subsequent decision making phases, fundamentally conditioning decision making outcomes. Avenues not considered at this stage are unlikely to be considered in the future. Further, decision making is most creative at these stages: there is a great deal of uncertainty at play but there are fewer constraints and there is less at stake. This paper argues that virtual worlds offer a potent combination of social, sensory and simulational capabilities that can stimulate creativity in decision making; and it also reports the findings of an investigation of the behavioural and cognitive aspects of creative decision making in Second Life®. The findings illustrate that Second Life users are faced with a kind of 'tyranny of freedom': if anything is possible, where does one start? The answer appears to lie in a kind of 'retrospective foresight' whereby decision makers draw upon prior experiences and use analogical reasoning to articulate metaphorical systems of thought.
      319Scopus© Citations 9
  • Publication
    Designing the Future Perfect: Reorganising is Research Around the Axis of Intention
    (AISel, 2016-06-15)
    According to Barbara Adam, 'time is such an obvious factor in social science that it is almost invisible'. Indeed, Information Systems (IS) researchers have relied upon taken-for-granted assumptions about the nature of time and have built theories that are frequently silent about the temporal nature of our being in the world. This paper addresses two key questions about time in IS research: (i) what formulations of time are available to us in our research and (ii) how can these formulations be used in a coherent way in our research? In addressing the first question, two meta-formulations of time are examined. The first relates time to the sense of passing time expressed in successive readings of the clock. The second relates time to the experience of purposive, intentional, goal-directed behaviour. Our proposal is that IS researchers should be encouraged to identify the formulations of time that underpin their research. Our goal is to provide a framework to allow IS researchers to evaluate the fit between the goals of research and the temporal assumptions being used to underpin it and ultimately to investigate the extent to theories that are based on different assumptions about time can be combined or integrated.
      189