Now showing 1 - 10 of 14
  • Publication
    Structure-activity relationship of a novel family of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist quinoline compounds with anti-angiogenic activity
    Introduction: Previously, we identified quininib (2-[(E)-2-(quinolin-2-yl)vinyl]phenol), a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist with anti-angiogenic and anti-permeable activity (1,2). Here, we report a structure activity relationship study to more comprehensively characterise features which confer anti-angiogenic activity.
      59
  • Publication
    The effects of corticosteroid drugs on the visual function of zebrafish
    (British Pharmacological Society, 2018-04-01) ;
    Introduction: Glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness, is a heterogenous eye condition characterized by gradual loss of visual acuity due to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (1). Glaucoma is an off-target effect of corticosteroids when administered intraocularly for treatment of some ocular indications (2). This study uses zebrafish to study whether a glaucoma-type disease is induced by treatment with corticosteroids by assessing the effects on retinal histology and visual function.
      131
  • Publication
    Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor as a Treatment Option for Retinal Degeneration
    This review discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) for retinal degeneration. BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) and NT-4/NT-5 belong to the neurotrophin family. These neuronal modulators activate a common receptor and a specific tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptor. BDNF was identified as a photoreceptor protectant in models of retinal degeneration as early as 1992. However, development of effective therapeutics that exploit this pathway has been difficult due to challenges in sustaining therapeutic levels in the retina.
      214Scopus© Citations 17
  • Publication
    The Role of Mitochondria in Optic Atrophy With Autosomal Inheritance
    Optic atrophy (OA) with autosomal inheritance is a form of optic neuropathy characterized by the progressive and irreversible loss of vision. In some cases, this is accompanied by additional, typically neurological, extra-ocular symptoms. Underlying the loss of vision is the specific degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) which form the optic nerve. Whilst autosomal OA is genetically heterogenous, all currently identified causative genes appear to be associated with mitochondrial organization and function. However, it is unclear why RGCs are particularly vulnerable to mitochondrial aberration. Despite the relatively high prevalence of this disorder, there are currently no approved treatments. Combined with the lack of knowledge concerning the mechanisms through which aberrant mitochondrial function leads to RGC death, there remains a clear need for further research to identify the underlying mechanisms and develop treatments for this condition. This review summarizes the genes known to be causative of autosomal OA and the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by pathogenic mutations. Furthermore, we discuss the suitability of available in vivo models for autosomal OA with regards to both treatment development and furthering the understanding of autosomal OA pathology.
      140Scopus© Citations 4
  • Publication
    A brain-derived neurotrophic factor mimetic is sufficient to restore cone photoreceptor visual function in an inherited blindness model
    Controversially, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are in clinical trial for the treatment of inherited retinal degeneration. Utilizing the zebrafish dyeucd6 model, we determined if treatment with HDACi can rescue cone photoreceptor-mediated visual function. dye exhibit defective visual behaviour and retinal morphology including ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) cell death and decreased photoreceptor outer segment (OS) length, as well as gross morphological defects including hypopigmentation and pericardial oedema. HDACi treatment of dye results in significantly improved optokinetic (OKR) (~43 fold, p < 0.001) and visualmotor (VMR) (~3 fold, p < 0.05) responses. HDACi treatment rescued gross morphological defects and reduced CMZ cell death by 80%. Proteomic analysis of dye eye extracts suggested BDNF-TrkB and Akt signaling as mediators of HDACi rescue inour dataset. Cotreatment with the TrkB antagonist ANA-12 blocked HDACi rescue of visual function and associated Akt phosphorylation. Notably, sole treatment with a BDNF mimetic, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone hydrate, significantly rescued dye visual function (~58 fold increase in OKR, p < 0.001, ~3 fold increase in VMR, p < 0.05). In summary, HDACi and a BDNF mimetic are sufficient to rescue retinal cell death and visual function in a vertebrate model of inherited blindness.
      646Scopus© Citations 28
  • Publication
    Investigation of the role of cysteinyl leukotrienes in ocular developmental angiogenesis
    Previously, we identified quininib (2-[(E)-2-(quinolin-2-yl)vinyl] phenol) and a related series of cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) receptor antagonists which inhibit hyaloid vessel development in zebrafish eyes. Here, we more comprehensively characterise the expression and function of specific cysLT signalling components in ocular developmental angiogenesis.
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  • Publication
    Can histone deacetylase inhibitors uncover novel therapeutic agents for inherited retinal dystrophies
    Inherited retinal dystrophies (iRDs) affect 1 in 3000 people worldwide and effective treatment options are not widely available due to the genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Recently, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have gained attention as a potential therapeutic option based on their neuroprotective effects within the retina. However, the benefits of HDACi remains highly controversial, and their downstream mechanism of action are yet to be thoroughly elucidated. Preliminary data from studies conducted has shown that treatment of zebrafish retinal mutant with HDACi, trichostatin A (TSA), could rescue visual capacity and retinal morphology. The current study is designed to address the suitability of HDACi as therapeutic options for iRDs using zebrafish models.
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  • Publication
    Unexpected genetic heterogeneity for primary ciliary dyskinesia in the Irish Traveller population
    We present a study of five children from three unrelated Irish Traveller families presenting with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). As previously characterized disorders in the Irish Traveller population are caused by common homozygous mutations, we hypothesised that all three PCD families shared the same recessive mutation. However, exome sequencing showed that there was no pathogenic homozygous mutation common to all families. This finding was supported by histology, which showed that each family has a different type of ciliary defect; transposition defect (family A), nude epithelium (family B) and absence of inner and outer dynein arms (family C). Therefore, each family was analysed independently using homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing. The affected siblings in family A share a novel 1 bp duplication in RSPH4A (NM_001161664.1:c.166dup; p.Arg56Profs*11), a radial-spoke head protein involved in ciliary movement. In family B, we identified three candidate genes (CCNO, KCNN3 and CDKN1C), with a 5-bp duplication in CCNO (NM_021147.3:c.258_262dup; p.Gln88Argfs*8) being the most likely cause of ciliary aplasia. This is the first study to implicate CCNO, a DNA repair gene reported to be involved in multiciliogenesis, in PCD. In family C, we identified a ~3.5-kb deletion in DYX1C1, a neuronal migration gene previously associated with PCD. This is the first report of a disorder in the relatively small Irish Traveller population to be caused by >1 disease gene. Our study identified at least three different PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population, highlighting that one cannot always assume genetic homogeneity, even in small consanguineous populations.
      521Scopus© Citations 21
  • Publication
    Discovery and Development of the Quininib Series of Ocular Drugs
    The quininib series is a novel collection of small-molecule drugs with antiangiogenic, antivascular permeability, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative activity. Quininib was initially identified as a drug hit during a random chemical library screen for determinants of developmental ocular angiogenesis in zebrafish. To enhance drug efficacy, novel quininib analogs were designed by applying medicinal chemistry approaches. The resulting quininib drug series has efficacy in in vitro and ex vivo models of angiogenesis utilizing human cell lines and tissues. In vivo, quininib drugs reduce pathological angiogenesis and retinal vascular permeability in rodent models. Quininib acts as a cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT) receptor antagonist, revealing new roles of these G-protein-coupled receptors in developmental angiogenesis of the eye and unexpectedly in uveal melanoma (UM). The quininib series highlighted the potential of CysLT receptors as therapeutic targets for retinal vasculopathies (e.g., neovascular age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and diabetic macular edema) and ocular cancers (e.g., UM).
      311
  • Publication
    Protocol for a preclinical systematic review and meta-analysis of pharmacological targeting of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in experimental renal injury
    Introduction Impaired lipid metabolism in the renal tubule plays a prominent role in the progression of renal fibrosis following acute kidney injury (AKI) and in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are promising druggable targets to mitigate renal fibrosis by redirecting metabolism, including restoration of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) capacity. We aim to synthesise evidence from preclinical studies of pharmacological PPAR targeting in experimental renal injury, and inform the design of future studies evaluating PPAR-mediated restoration of FAO in AKI and CKD.
    Scopus© Citations 2  101