Now showing 1 - 10 of 11
  • Publication
    Sustaining Data Archives over Time: Lessons from the Organisational Studies Literature
    The long-term preservation of digital data involves a complex intersection of technologies, institutions, stakeholders, and policies. But for data to remain accessible over time, the data repository which houses it, preserves it, and circulates it must itself be sustainable. The sustainability of data repositories is a growing concern as researchers, archival practitioners, and funders of digital archive projects seek to ensure that resources invested in research will have benefits that endure beyond the period of individual research contracts and grants. However, sustainability efforts are limited by lack of long-term comparative studies of digital repositories in research field contexts, national and market contexts [6]. Also, there has been little attempt to synthesize the organisational literature with practitioner perspectives in an effort understand how successful data archives maintain themselves (and how and why some data archives do not). This paper will explore how organisational theory approaches to understanding institutional sustainability could be applied to contemporary data archives and archival practices, with the aim of raising larger questions about data sustainability. The paper is part of a larger study in progress of how one particular example of long-lived archives, Social Science Data Archives (SSDAs), have maintained themselves over time. SSDAs predate both computers and the Internet and provide a unique opportunity to examine perceptions about what makes an archive sustainable, through the ups and downs of funding cycles and massive changes in technical and organisational infrastructure.
      201
  • Publication
    Social Science Data Archives: A Historical Social Network Analysis
    (International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology, 2017) ; ; ;
    As public investment in archiving research data grows, there has been increasing attention to the longevity or sustainability of the data repositories that curate such data. While there have been many conceptual frameworks developed and case reports of individual archives and digital repositories, there have been few empirical studies of how such archives persist over time. In this paper, we draw upon organizational studies theories to approach the issue of sustainability from an organizational perspective, focusing specifically on the organizational histories of three social science data archives (SSDA): ICPSR, UKDA, and LIS. Using a framework of organizational resilience to understand how archives perceive crisis, respond to it, and learn from experience, this article reports on an empirical study of sustainability in these long-lived SSDAs. The study draws from archival documents and interviews to examine how sustainability can and should be conceptualized as on-going processes over time and not as a quality at a single moment. Implications for research and practice in data archive sustainability are discussed.
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  • Publication
    Public-Private Partnerships in Data Services: Learning From Geneaology
    As one strategy for expanding access to archival data, libraries and data archives are increasingly entering into Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) with commercial entities. In exchange for access to publicly held sources of information of interest to genealogists, com-mercial companies are providing financial resources for digitization and access. This paper reviews recent literature on these public-private partnerships, considers challenges and long-term implications of these relationships in data services by reviewing issues experienced in the including tensions with institutional missions, access differentiation, exclusivity agreements and nondisclosure agreements and marginalization of services financed by public data.
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  • Publication
    Organizational resilience, financial strategies, and social science data archives
    How do financial strategies, and changes to financial strategies over time, contribute to the organizational resiliency of data archives? We explore the challenges, crisis and opportunities faced by data archives over 40 years and the financial strategies they have employed to deal with challenges and opportunities. This paper describes how two well-known social science data archives, ICPSR and the UK Data Archive (UKDA), adopted and adapted their financial structures over a 40 year period in order to remain sustainable.
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  • Publication
    Social Science Data Archives: Case Studies in Data Sustainability
    There has been a sizeable investment in the development of large-scale data and appropriate infrastructures in the physical and biological sciences and increasingly in the social sciences and humanities. Concerns about data sustainability have attracted a great deal of attention as research project data collection represents a significant investment, and loss of subsequent use of that data represents a loss of potential value.  In this poster, we focus on of the most long-lived examples of data archives: Social Science Data Archives (SSDAs).  SSDAs provide a long view on these topics as they predate both computers and the Internet. They also provide a unique opportunity to examine perceptions about what makes an archive sustainable over long periods of time, through the ups and downs of funding cycles and massive changes in technical and organizational infrastructure.  In this study, we report on preliminary research on the historical, institutional, and operational dimensions over SSDAs over time.  Drawing upon analyses of institutional and policy documents and interviews with staff, depositors, and administrators, this poster briefly discusses current challenges to SSDA longevity and implications for We describe initial findings with respect to these two SSDAs and detail next steps in expanding the study both theoretically and methodologically.
      316
  • Publication
    Of Seamlessness and Frictions: Transborder Data Flows of European and US Social Science Data
    Open science initiatives are predicated upon managing research data to overcome "data frictions," or the points of resistance in the movement of data time [12]. This paper explores organizational creation of data frictions to manage the flow of data from one data organization to another. We describe the creation and modification of data frictions between European data organizations and between data organizations in Europe and the USA. We analyze historical documentary data from CESSDA, an umbrella organization representing European data organizations that has served as a platform for development of international data sharing arrangements from the 1960s through today.
      192Scopus© Citations 4
  • Publication
    Sustaining Data Archives over Time: Lessons from the Organizational Studies Literature
    (Taylor and Francis, 2015-12-17) ;
    This article will explore how organizational theoretic approaches to understanding institutional sustainability could be applied to contemporary data archives and archival practices, with the aim of raising larger questions about data sustainability. The article is part of a larger study in progress of how one particular example of long-lived archives, Social Science Data Archives (SSDAs), have maintained themselves over time. SSDAs predate both computers and the Internet and provide a unique opportunity to examine perceptions about what makes an archive sustainable, through the ups and downs of funding cycles and massive changes in technical and organizational infrastructure.
      587Scopus© Citations 4
  • Publication
    Inter-organisational coordination work in digital curation: The case of Eurobarometer
    Open research is predicated upon seamless access to curated research data. Major national and European funding schemes, such as Horizon Europe, strongly encourage or require publicly funded data to be FAIR - that is, Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable (Wilkinson 2016). What underpins such initiatives are the many data organizations and repositories working with their stakeholders and each other to establish policies and practices, implement them, and do the curatorial work to increase the available, discoverability, and accessibility of high quality research data. However, such work has often been invisible and underfunded, necessitating creative and collaborative solutions. In this paper, we briefly describe how one such case from social science data: the processing of the Eurobarometer data set. Using content analysis of administrative documents and interviews, we detail how European data archives managed the tensions of curatorial work across borders and jurisdictions from the 1970s to the mid-2000s, the challenges that they faced in distributing work, and the solutions they found. In particular, we look at the interactions of the Council of European Social Science Data Archives (CESSDA) and social science data organizations (DO) like UKDA, ICPSR, and GESIS and the institutional and organizational collaborations that made Eurobarometer “too big to fail”. We describe some of the invisible work that they underwent in the past in making data in Europe findable, accessible, interoperable, and conclude with implications for “frictionless” data access and reuse today.
      170
  • Publication
    A nine dimensional framework for digital cultural heritage organizational sustainability: A content analysis of the LIS literature (2000–2015)
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to report on how library and information science (LIS) as a field operationalizes the concept of organizational sustainability for managing digital resources, projects and infrastructures such as digital libraries and repositories over time. It introduces a nine dimensional framework for organizational sustainability in the digital cultural heritage community. Design/methodology/approach Content analysis of publications from three LIS databases (2000–2015). Findings Comparing the articles to the nine dimension framework shows that most LIS articles discuss technology, financial or management dimensions. Fewer articles describe disaster planning, assessment or policy dimensions. Research limitations/implications Three LIS databases might not include all relevant journals, conferences, white papers and other materials. The data set also did not include books; library management textbooks might include useful material on organizational sustainability. Claims about the prevalence of themes are subject to methodological limits of content analysis. Practical implications Organizations that steward digital collections need to be clear about what they mean when they are referring to organizational sustainability so that they can make appropriate decisions for future-proofing their collections. The analysis would also suggest for a greater need to consider the full range of dimensions of organizational sustainability. Originality/value By introducing a new nine dimensional framework of organizational sustainability the authors hope to promote more and better conversations within the LIS community about organizational sustainability. The authors hope these conversations will lead to productive action and improvements in the arrangements of people and work necessary to keep digital projects and services going over time, given ongoing challenges.
      290Scopus© Citations 21
  • Publication
    Studying the History of Social Science Data Archives as Knowledge Infrastructure
    (Finnish Society for Science and Technology Studies, 2016-05-13) ; ;
    In this paper, we develop a brief history of Social Science Data Archives (SSDAs) and their implications for evolving scholarship on the sustainability and coordination of contemporary knowledge infrastructures.  We draw upon analyses of institutional and policy documents and interviews from active SSDAs as well as field level analyses of professional societies for staff and representatives of SSDAs.  We examine the history of SSDAs in shaping the social sciences of the latter part of the twentieth century, their strategies for remaining active and relevant through institutional and financial uncertainty, and conclude with implications for current STS scholarship in cyberinfrastructures and open data.
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