Now showing 1 - 10 of 22
  • Publication
    Research involving people of a refugee background: Considerations for ethical engagement
    This paper is of relevance to both those considering carrying out research and those participating in it. It is based on discussions between three researchers of a non-refugee background and a small group of nine people of a refugee background living in Ireland and Scotland, all of whom have been involved in research in some way. The paper is divided into three sections outlining what should be considered before, during and after data has been collected from people of a refugee background.
      1000
  • Publication
    #Direct Provision 14: No Place To Call Home
    Compilation of contributions to a direct provision Blogathon on Human Rights in Ireland (www.humanrights.ie) on 10 April 2014, marking 14 years of the system of direct provision.
      1620
  • Publication
      845
  • Publication
    Transition: from Direct Provision to life in the community
    Qualtiative study of the experiences of former asylum seekers transitioning from direct provision to the wider community. Conducted in collaboration with the Irish Refugee Council.
      831
  • Publication
    Vulnerable Childhood, Vulnerable Adulthood: Direct Provision as Aftercare for Aged-Out Separated Children Seeking Asylum in Ireland
    (Sage Publications, 2017-02-17) ;
    Ireland's approach to after-care for aged-out separated children is problematic. Currently, upon reaching the age of 18, most separated young people are moved to direct provision, despite the fact that the State can use discretionary powers to allow them to remain in foster care. Direct provision is the system Ireland adopts providing bed and board to asylum seekers, along with a weekly monetary payment. Separated young people in Ireland are in a vulnerable position after ageing out. Entry into the direct provision system, from a legal and social work perspective, is concerning. Utilising direct provision as a 'form of aftercare' emphasises Governmental policy preferences that privilege the migrant status of aged-out separated children, as opposed to viewing this group as young people leaving care. In this article, utilising a cross disciplinary approach, we provide the first systematic exploration of the system of aftercare for aged-out separated children in Ireland. In doing so, we posit two core reasons for why the aftercare system for aged-out separated children has developed as it has. First, doing so ensures that the state is consistent with its approach to asylum seekers more generally, in that it seeks to deter persons from claiming asylum in Ireland through utilisation of the direct provision system. Second, while the vulnerability of aged-out separated children is well-documented, the State (and others) ignore this vulnerability and are reluctant to offer additional aftercare supports beyond direct provision. This is due, we argue, to viewing aged-out separated children as having a lesser entitlement to rights than other care leavers, solely based on their migrant status.
      1510Scopus© Citations 19
  • Publication
    Direct Provision as Aftercare for Aged-Out Separated Children in Ireland
    Ireland’s approach to after-care for 'aged-out' separated children is problematic. Currently, upon reaching the age of 18, most separated young people are moved to 'direct provision', despite the fact that the State can use discretionary powers to allow them to remain in foster care. Direct provision is the system Ireland adopts providing bed and board to asylum seekers, along with a weekly monetary payment. Separated young people in Ireland are in a vulnerable position after ageing out. Entry into the direct provision system, from a legal and social work perspective, is concerning. Utilising direct provision as a 'form of aftercare' emphasises Governmental policy preferences that privilege the migrant status of aged-out separated children, as opposed to viewing this group as young people leaving care. Utilising a cross disciplinary approach, this article reviews the literature to critically analyse these issues from socio-legal and social work perspectives. This analysis will be placed in the context of primary qualitative research with experiences of separated children and young people and key stakeholders. This article concludes, that the administrative and legal approaches to aged-out separated children tend to limit the ability of the State to provide adequate aftercare supports to these young people. Ultimately, their migrant status is privileged over their status as care leavers.
      306
  • Publication
    The integration of asylum seeking and refugee children: resilience in the face of adversity
    Forced migration, particularly as it applies to children, tends to be viewed as a fraught and difficult experience. As a result, the vulnerability of young forced migrants has tended to dominate the literature, especially within quantitative studies. Concerns abound in relation to the ability of refugees to rebuild their lives and to integrate into new countries, particularly if they come from places that are considered very different from their reception countries. These differences might include the languages spoken, political systems in place, or the ethnic, religious, or cultural backgrounds of the majority population. However, increasing emphasis is now being placed on the resilience of child refugees, with attention drawn to their sense of agency, their capacities, and their efforts to cope with the challenges they face. This is especially highlighted in qualitative studies where the perspectives and voices of migrant children are privileged (e.g. Ní Raghallaigh and Gilligan, 2010; Smyth et al., 2015; Lind, 2017).
      1126
  • Publication
    Transitioning from Direct Provision to life in the community: The experiences of those who have been granted refugee status, subsidiary protection or 'leave to remain' in Ireland
    (Taskforce on Transitional Supports for Persons Granted Status in Direct Provision, 2015-09) ;
    This submission is based on the preliminary findings of research that is funded by the Irish Research Council under its New Foundations – Engaging Civil Society strand. The research was conducted in partnership with the Irish Refugee Council. A research team of academics and asylum seekers conducted interviews with ex-asylum seekers who have been granted refugee status, subsidiary protection or 'leave to remain', as well as with relevant stakeholders. A total of 22 individuals who had experience of living in Direct Provision (DP) hostel(s) were interviewed. Fourteen had already made the transition and eight were in the process of trying to move out. To date, five stakeholder interviews have taken place.
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  • Publication
    The negotiation of culture in foster care placments for separated refugee and asylum seeking young people in Ireland and England
    Little is known about separated asylum seeking young people in foster care. This article addresses this gap by drawing together findings from qualitative research conducted with separated refugee and asylum seeking young people in two studies - one in England and one in Ireland. Focusing on the role of culture, the authors examine similar findings from the two studies on the significance of culture in young people's experiences of foster care. Culturally 'matched' placements are often assumed to provide continuity in relation to cultural identity. This article draws on young people's accounts of 'matched' and 'non-matched' placements to examine the extent to which this may be the case for separated young people. It was found that young people regarded it as important to maintain continuity in relation to their cultures of origin, but that cultural 'matching' with foster carers according to country of origin and/or religion was not the only means for achieving this. The authors suggest that practitioners need to adopt an individualised approach in determining whether a 'matched' or a cross-cultural placement best meets the various needs of separated young people, including their identity development needs.
      1266Scopus© Citations 40