Now showing 1 - 8 of 8
  • Publication
    International Migration in Ireland, 2016
    (University College Dublin. Geary Institute, 2017-08-08)
    This working paper is the Irish report to the OECD Expert Group on Migration. As such, the focus of the report is largely shaped by the reporting requirements for the preparation of the annual OECD International Migration Outlook. The purpose of the paper is to outline major developments and trends in migration and integration data and policy. The principal reference year is 2015, although information relating to early-2016 is included where available and relevant. The Executive Summary provides an overview of the main findings of the report. Section 2 discusses the main developments in migration and integration policy in Ireland in 2015, including topics related to migration in the public debate. Section 3 discusses the statistics on inward and outward migration movements. Section 4 examines trends in the population. Migration and the labour market are discussed in Section 5. Section 6 describes developments in relation to forced and voluntary return.
      288
  • Publication
    Case Study on Intreo: The one-stop-shop for job seekers in Ireland. Case Studies on Innovation and Reform in the Irish Public Sector
    (Department of Public Expenditure and Reform, 2017-07) ;
    This case study analyses the implementation of Intreo, the one-stop shop for jobseekers in Ireland, between 2010 and 2016. The implementation followed an iterative and incremental process, where the Department of Social Protection displayed a high adaptive capacity. Prior to the establishment of Intreo, benefit payments and activation services were highly fragmented at the organisational and policy levels. During the fiscal and economic crisis several reform strands came together that led to an organisational merger, an integrated one-stop shop service model for jobseekers and innovative alignment of labour market activation measures. The key challenges highlighted in the study are change management with limited resources, complex industrial relations negotiations to redeploy staff and designing a new service, while catering for an existing and increasing client base. Throughout the implementation process senior management and the core change team found innovative and flexible solutions to overcome the challenges. First, a small and experienced management team served as a flexible coordination hub. It shaped the broad vision and could react flexibly to changing agendas, but also relied heavily on support from other central units and frontline staff. This delegation of core tasks gave ownership of the change process to frontline staff and increased their support for the new service model. Second, the redeployment of staff benefited from coherent communication to frontline staff, respectful and strong labour relations, flexible union positions in the context of the crisis and the arbitration process set out in framework Croke Park and Haddington Road agreements. Third, the design process benefited from a broad vision right from the beginning that had been fleshed out in detail over time in an iterative process with strong involvement of frontline staff. In addition, the national roll-out included frontline staff. This enabled the basic template for service delivery to be amended locally to suit staffing levels, client base and physical infrastructure. Additional information on the public sector reform process can be found here:http://www.per.gov.ie/en/public-service-reform/
      479
  • Publication
    International Migration in Ireland, 2015
    (University College Dublin. Geary Institute, 2016-05) ; ;
    This working paper is the Irish report to the OECD Expert Group on Migration. As such, the focus of the report is largely shaped by the reporting requirements for the preparation of the annual OECD International Migration Outlook. The purpose of the paper is to outline major developments and trends in migration and integration data and policy. The principal reference year is 2014, although information relating to early- 2015 is included where available and relevant. The Executive Summary provides an overview of the main findings of the report. Section 2 discusses the main developments in migration and integration policy in Ireland in 2014, including topics related to migration in the public debate. Section 3 discusses the statistics on inward and outward migration movements. Section 4 examines trends in the population. Migration and the labour market are discussed in Section 5.
      504
  • Publication
    Public service activities among University staff
    (University College Dublin. Geary Institute, 2015-04-17) ; ;
    University staff frequently engage in Public Service Activities (PSAs), over and above their core roles, making a valuable contribution to society and the economy, although little is known about such activity. This study examines the extent of PSA among university staff — both academic and non-academic. The data come from a survey carried out in 2014 of the staff of University College Dublin (UCD), an Irish research university with a wide disciplinary coverage. The survey collected information about whether staff have taken part in PSAs and the amount of time spent engaging in these activities. Overall, 59 per cent of UCD academics and senior administrative staff report having taken part in PSAs over the past 12 months. The most common type of PSA is public engagement which encompasses talks, lectures and involvement in public debate through various media. Academic staff are much more likely than administrative staff to engage in PSA, but there is a significant contribution also from senior administrative staff. PSA engagement varies by discipline (with Arts and Humanities staff having the highest rates of PSA), by seniority and by length of tenure. Among those who have taken part in PSAs, the mean total yearly number of hours engaged in these activities is 167, ranging from 122 hours among researchers to 218 hours among professors. We estimate that all academics and senior administrators at UCD contributed over 150,000 hours in PSA over the course of the 2013-14 academic year, with an estimated value of nearly e11.5 million.
      156
  • Publication
    Irish Social Attitudes in 2018-19: topline results from round 9 of the European Social Survey
    (UCD Geary Institute for Public Policy, 2020-09-22) ; ; ;
    The National Coordinating Team at the Geary Institute for Public Policy at University College Dublin, in partnership with the Irish Research Council, is pleased to present the first national report ever produced for the European Social Survey in Ireland. Without peer, the European Social Survey has recorded the perspectives, aspirations, and concerns of the Irish population for nearly 20 years. Ireland has participated in each round of the biannual survey since the first (2002) and has already begun preparations for the 10th round, which will enter the field in 2021. This report offers an accessible and comprehensive overview of the main findings of the 9th round, which was collected by face-to-face interview between late 2018 and early 2019. The intention is to inform a broad audience and contextualise Irish public opinion over a period of significant economic uncertainty and demographic transformation.
      93
  • Publication
    International migration in Ireland, 2013
    (University College Dublin. Geary Institute, 2014-12) ;
    This working paper is based on the Irish report to the OECD Expert Group on Migration, and is the key Irish input to the preparation of the annual OECD International Migration Outlook. The principal reference year is 2012, although information relating to early- 2013 is included where available and relevant. Inward migration increased slightly to almost 56,000 in the twelve months to April 2013. With the recession, emigration increased, to over 89,000 over the same period. Net migration, which had peaked at a net inward flow of almost 105,000 in 2006-7 turned negative in 2009-10 and was -33,100 in 2012-13, a similar level of net emigration as the previous year. 
      611
  • Publication
    How did Immigrants fare in the Irish Labour Market over the Great Recession?
    (University College Dublin. Geary Institute for Public Policy, 2015-07) ; ; ;
    Much research has been undertaken to study the effects of the Great Recession on overall labour market dynamics, but less is known about the impact on immigrants and how it has evolved over the business cycle. Understanding how immigrants were affected is particularly important for Ireland given the important role migrants play in the labour market. This paper attempts to fill this gap by identifying the labour market impact of the Great Recession on immigrants compared to natives and how this relationship has evolved since the downturn. In particular, we compare both groups’ likelihood of being employed and their risk of unemployment pre (2006), at the start of (2008) and during the depth of the employment crisis (2010 and 2012), and as the economy begun to recover (2014). In our analyses, we separately identify the impact of the recession on immigrants who have gained Irish citizenship through naturalisation, from those that retained their country of birth nationality. The main findings of the paper are twofold: i) The employment penalty suffered by immigrant workers, relative to native workers, increased significantly over the Irish recession and subsequent recovery. Differences in labour market outcomes between immigrants and natives were accentuated by the recession, when the employment penalty was the highest. The penalty narrowed in the recovery, although it remains higher than before the crisis; ii) The more recent evolution of the employment penalty appears to be related to a composition effect, as many refugee immigrants with weak labour market attachment became naturalised citizens during the recession. This suggests that the difficulties that some immigrants experience in the labour market would be under-estimated without taking due account of naturalisation processes, as is done in this paper for the first time in Ireland.
      541
  • Publication
    International migration in Ireland, 2014
    (University College Dublin. Geary Institute, 2015-05) ;
    This working paper is based on the Irish report to the OECD Expert Group on Migration. As such, the focus of the report is largely shaped by the reporting requirements for the preparation of the annual OECD International Migration Outlook. The purpose of the paper is to outline major developments and trends in migration and integration data and policy. The principal reference year is 2013, although information relating to early-2014 is included where available and relevant.
      290