Now showing 1 - 10 of 10
  • Publication
    Sticking with a Winning Team: Better Neighbour Selection for Conversational Collaborative Recommendation
    Conversational recommender systems have recently emerged as useful alternative strategies to their single-shot counterpart, especially given their ability to expose a user’s current preferences. These systems use conversational feedback to hone in on the most suitable item for recommendation by improving the mechanism that finds useful collaborators. We propose a novel architecture for performing recommendation that incorporates information about the individual performance of neighbours during a recommendation session, into the neighbour retrieval mechanism. We present our architecture and a set of preliminary evaluation results that suggest there is some merit to our approach.We examine these results and discuss what they mean for future research.
      155
  • Publication
    A quantitative evaluation of the relative status of journal and conference publications in computer science
    While it is universally held by computer scientists that conference publications have a higher status in computer science than in other disciplines there is little quantitative evidence in support of this position. The importance of journal publications in academic promotion makes this a big issue since an exclusive focus on journal papers will miss many significant papers published at conferences in computer science. In this paper we set out to quantify the relative importance of journal and conference papers in computer science. We show that computer science papers in leading conferences match the impact of papers in mid-ranking journals and surpass the impact of papers in journals in the bottom half of the ISI rankings - when im- pact is measured by citations in Google Scholar. We also show that there is a poor correlation between this measure of impact and conference acceptance rates. This indicates that conference publication is an inefficient market where venues that are equally challenging in terms of rejection rates offer quite different returns in terms of citations.
      2490Scopus© Citations 111
  • Publication
    From physical models to well-founded control
    Mobile sensors are an attractive proposition for environmental sensing, but pose significant engineering problems. Not least amongst these is the need to match the behaviour of the sensor platform to the physical environment in which it operates. We present initial work on using models of physical processes to generate models for autonomic control, and speculate that these can be used to improve the confidence we can place in sensed data.
      991Scopus© Citations 2
  • Publication
    The Ambient Calendar
    It is becoming difficult to convey information from an everincreasing number of digital sources to users in a condensed and meaningful way. This growth has particularly occurred with peripheral information sources. These are of general interest to users, but do no require or typically command constant focus or attention. Examples include weather, stock data, blogs, and calendars. Ambient Displays present information unobtrusively in an intelligent fashion using abstract visual cues and metaphors and have the possibility of acting as a complement to information filtering systems. We describe the implementation of an ambient display that contains elements representing time, weather, public transport departure times, and the proximity of friends. An initial impact study was undertaken and found a high sense of usefulness and curiosity in the finished application and in the field as a whole.
      1013
  • Publication
    Using situation lattices in sensor analysis
    Highly sensorised systems present two parallel challenges: how to design a sensor suite that can efficiently and cost-effectively support the needs of given services; and to extract the semantically relevant interpretations, or “situations”, from the flood of context data collected by the sensors. We describe mathematical structures called situation lattices that can be used to address these two problems simultaneously, allowing designers to both design and refine situation identification whilst offering insights into the design of sensor suites. We validate the accuracy and efficiency of our technique against a third-party data set and demonstrate how it can be used to evaluate sensor suite designs.
      725Scopus© Citations 16
  • Publication
    Reminding Short-Term Memory Sufferers to Complete Routine Tasks
    (University College Dublin. School of Computer Science and Informatics, 2007-09-28) ;
    With the general increase of life span that our advances in health care have afforded us, more people are suffering from short term memory loss than ever before. Short term memory sufferers often forget what they were doing in the middle of a task and can find themselves in dangerous situations, such as leaving the stove on and leaving the house. They could benefit from an RFID based reminder system that would determine what they were doing based on what objects they touch. To use the system, the user wears an RFID glove which has a reader in the palm. The RFID glove reads the tags on the nearby objects. Along with the RFID glove we are developing an application that enables the user to interact with a reminder application. The application alerts the user of important activities they may have forgotten they started and when an activity is interrupted. It also keeps a record of the list of activities they have performed and objects they have touched through out the day.
      104
  • Publication
    Activity recognition using temporal evidence theory
    The ability to identify the behavior of people in a home is at the core of Smart Home functionality. Such environments are equipped with sensors that unobtrusively capture information about the occupants. Reasoning mechanisms transform the technical, frequently noisy data of sensors into meaningful interpretations of occupant activities. Time is a natural human way to reason about activities. People's activities in the home often have an identifiable routine; activities place at distinct times throughout the day and last for predicable lengths of time. However, the inclusion of temporal information is still limited in the domain of activity recognition. Evidence theory is gaining increasing interest in the field of activity recognition, and is suited to the incorporation of time related domain knowledge into the reasoning process. In this paper, an evidential reasoning framework that incorporates temporal knowledge is presented. We evaluate the effectiveness of the framework using a third party published smart home dataset. An improvement in activity recognition of 70% is achieved when time patterns and activity durations are included in activity recognition. We also compare our approach with Naïve Bayes classifier and J48 Decision Tree, with temporal evidence theory achieving higher accuracies than both classifiers.
    Scopus© Citations 76  1282
  • Publication
    Connecting Families by Sharing the Minutiae of their Lives
    (University College Dublin. School of Computer Science and Informatics, 2008-08) ;
    Recent studies have shown that in distributed families keeping in touch is essential; this calls for technologies that can connect family members and bring them closer virtually. There are several social networking technologies online, but they are seldom designed for family connectedness and do not cater for the needs of computer-novice relatives. We present Near Dear, an application that brings online tools to an ambient display at home. The ambient display makes it easy for computer-novices to update and access online networking tools. We also conducted a user trial and evaluation of this system which indicated that the developed system is convenient and intuitive.
      76
  • Publication
    A Quantitative Evaluation of the Relative Status of Journal and Conference Publications in Computer Science
    (University College Dublin. School of Computer Science and Informatics, 2008-10) ; ; ;
    While it is universally held by computer scientists that conference publications have a higher status in computer science than in other disciplines there is little quantitative evidence in support of this position. The importance of journal publications in academic promotion makes this a big issue since a focus on journal papers only will miss many significant papers published at conferences in computer science. In this paper we set out to quantify the relative importance of journal and conference papers in computer science. We show that computer science papers in leading conferences match the impact of papers in mid-ranking journals and surpass the impact of papers in journals in the bottom half of the ISI rankings – when impact is measured by citations in Google Scholar. We also show that there is a poor correlation between this measure of impact and conference acceptance rates. This indicates that conference publication is an inefficient market where venues that are equally challenging in terms of rejection rates offer quite different returns in terms of citations.
      78
  • Publication
    Ontology-based query recommendation as a support to image retrieval
    Stock photo libraries are the most common means for publishers and advertisers to find images for their media. Searching for the perfect photo can be a time-consuming and frustrating task. This is because searching is often dependent on the descriptors or tags given to each photo by the editors and contributors to the library. The tagging process is subjective, further complicating the search process. We describe an algorithm that uses domain ontologies to improve the interactions with these libraries. Ontologies are used to expand query terms based on users' initial search queries.We present results that demonstrate that the use of ontologies greatly improves users ability to retrieve photos when undertaking a number of search tasks.
      488