Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    The Irish Maternity Early Warning System (IMEWS)
    In the acute hospital setting, the use of early warning scores (EWS) to monitor vital signs (including heart rate, respiratory rate [RR], blood pressure and temperature) has been shown to be beneficial in the early diagnosis and prompt initiation of treatment in adults with a critical illness. This led to the development of the National Early Warning Score (NEWS) in Ireland by the Health Services Executive’s (HSE) Acute Medicine Clinical Care Programme. The NEWS was the first guideline endorsed by the National Clinical Effectiveness Committee (NCEC) and was launched by the Minister of Health Dr James Reilly in 2013. The implementation of NEWS is now mandatory in all acute hospitals. However, NEWS is not suitable for use in pregnancy because a woman's vital signs change physiologically from early in pregnancy. National reports in Ireland and the United Kingdom (UK) on maternal mortality have led to recommendations that a modified obstetric EWS be introduced. In Ireland, these recommendations have been further supported by separate investigations in 2008 and 2013 on two maternal deaths from sepsis.
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  • Publication
    Examination of cell-host-biomaterial interactions via high-throughput technologies : a re-appraisal
    Biomaterials are required to act harmoniously when exposed to the body or bodily fluids. Investigating cellular or in vivo phenotypic responses and protein adsorption to the material surface helps to determine the associated biocompatibility. Past limitations on progress in this field include time-consuming cell-based screening tools and a limited understanding of the complex nature of cell–biomaterial interactions. While high-throughput technologies by their nature are a rapid tool to derive meaning from multifaceted systems and, in recent years, the biomaterial community is beginning to take advantage of these technologies, the key observation in this Leading Opinion Paper is that the biomaterials community has been slow to accept these methods as an addition to their traditional experimentation workflow. The purpose of this paper is to review the definition and recent usage of high-throughput experiments in order to examine biomaterial interactions at the cellular and wider host level, especially as they become more relevant within the biomaterials arena encapsulating tissue engineering, gene, drug and stem cell delivery systems. The technologies under focus include rapid cell-based screening, transcriptomics and proteomics.
      1556Scopus© Citations 26