Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) for functional characterization of disease resistance genes in barley seedlings
    With the recent advances in sequencing technologies, many studies are generating lists of candidate genes associated with specific traits. The major bottleneck in functional genomics is the validation of gene function. This is achieved by analyzing the effect of either gene silencing or overexpression on a specific phenotypic or biochemical trait. This usually requires the generation of stable transgenic plants and this can take considerable time. Therefore any technique that expedites the validation of gene function is of particular benefit in cereals, including barley. One such technique is Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS), which evokes a natural antiviral defense mechanism in plants. VIGS can be used to downregulate gene expression in a transient manner, but long enough to determine its effects on a specific phenotype. It is particularly useful for screening candidate genes and selecting those with potential for disease control. VIGS based on Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) is a powerful and efficient tool for the analysis of gene function in cereals. Here we present a BSMV VIGS protocol for simple and robust gene silencing in barley and describe it to evaluate the role of the hormone receptor BRI1 (Brassinosteroid Insensitive 1) in barley leaf resistance to Fusarium infection.
      523ScopusĀ© Citations 5
  • Publication
    Insights from the Fungus Fusarium oxysporum Point to High Affinity Glucose Transporters as Targets for Enhancing Ethanol Production from Lignocellulose
    (Public Library of Science, 2013-01-30) ; ; ;
    Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt) from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km(glucose) was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing.
      238ScopusĀ© Citations 30