Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Publication
    Unexpected genetic heterogeneity for primary ciliary dyskinesia in the Irish Traveller population
    We present a study of five children from three unrelated Irish Traveller families presenting with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). As previously characterized disorders in the Irish Traveller population are caused by common homozygous mutations, we hypothesised that all three PCD families shared the same recessive mutation. However, exome sequencing showed that there was no pathogenic homozygous mutation common to all families. This finding was supported by histology, which showed that each family has a different type of ciliary defect; transposition defect (family A), nude epithelium (family B) and absence of inner and outer dynein arms (family C). Therefore, each family was analysed independently using homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing. The affected siblings in family A share a novel 1 bp duplication in RSPH4A (NM_001161664.1:c.166dup; p.Arg56Profs*11), a radial-spoke head protein involved in ciliary movement. In family B, we identified three candidate genes (CCNO, KCNN3 and CDKN1C), with a 5-bp duplication in CCNO (NM_021147.3:c.258_262dup; p.Gln88Argfs*8) being the most likely cause of ciliary aplasia. This is the first study to implicate CCNO, a DNA repair gene reported to be involved in multiciliogenesis, in PCD. In family C, we identified a ~3.5-kb deletion in DYX1C1, a neuronal migration gene previously associated with PCD. This is the first report of a disorder in the relatively small Irish Traveller population to be caused by >1 disease gene. Our study identified at least three different PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population, highlighting that one cannot always assume genetic homogeneity, even in small consanguineous populations.
      521Scopus© Citations 21
  • Publication
    First implication of STRA6 mutations in isolated anophthalmia, microphthalmia and coloboma: a new dimension to the STRA6 phenotype
    Microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) are structural congenital eye malformations that cause a significant proportion of childhood visual impairments. Several disease genes have been identified but do not account for all MAC cases, suggesting that additional risk loci exist. We used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) homozygosity mapping (HM) and targeted next-generation sequencing to identify the causative mutation for autosomal recessive isolated colobomatous microanophthalmia (MCOPCB) in a consanguineous Irish Traveller family. We identified a double-nucleotide polymorphism (g.1157G>A and g.1156G>A; p.G304K) in STRA6 that was homozygous in all of the MCOPCB patients. The STRA6 p.G304K mutation was subsequently detected in additional MCOPCB patients, including one individual with Matthew-Wood syndrome (MWS; MCOPS9). STRA6 encodes a transmembrane receptor involved in vitamin A uptake, a process essential to eye development and growth. We have shown that the G304K mutant STRA6 protein is mislocalized and has severely reduced vitamin A uptake activity. Furthermore, we reproduced the MCOPCB phenotype in a zebrafish disease model by inhibiting retinoic acid (RA) synthesis, suggesting that diminished RA levels account for the eye malformations in STRA6 p.G304K patients. The current study demonstrates that STRA6 mutations can cause isolated eye malformations in addition to the congenital anomalies observed in MWS.
      256Scopus© Citations 60
  • Publication
    Clinical and genetic characterisation of infantile liver failure syndrome type 1, due to recessive mutations in LARS
    Background: Recessive LARS mutations were recently reported to cause a novel syndrome, infantile liver failure syndrome type 1 (ILFS1), in six Irish Travellers. We have since identified four additional patients, including one of Ashkenazi origin, representing the largest ILFS1 cohort to date. Our study aims to define the ILFS1 clinical phenotype to help guide diagnosis and patient management. Methods: We clinically evaluated and reviewed the medical records of ten ILFS1 patients. Clinical features, histopathology and natural histories were compared and patient management strategies reviewed. Results: Early failure to thrive, recurrent liver dysfunction, anemia, hypoalbuminemia and seizures were present in all patients. Most patients (90 %) had developmental delay. Encephalopathic episodes triggered by febrile illness have occurred in 80 % and were fatal in two children. Two patients are currently >28 years old and clinically well. Leucine supplementation had no appreciable impact on patient well-being. However, we suggest that the traditional management of reducing/stopping protein intake in patients with metabolic hepatopathies may not be appropriate for ILFS1. We currently recommend ensuring sufficient natural protein intake when unwell. Conclusions: We report the first non-Irish ILFS1 patient, suggesting ILFS1 may be more extensive than anticipated. Low birth weight, early failure to thrive, anemia and hypoalbuminemia are amongst the first presenting features, with liver dysfunction before age 1. Episodic hepatic dysfunction is typically triggered by febrile illness, and becomes less severe with increasing age. While difficult to anticipate, two patients are currently >28 years old, suggesting that survival beyond childhood may be associated with a favourable long-term prognosis.
      1058Scopus© Citations 41
  • Publication
    A case report of primary ciliary dyskinesia, laterality defects and developmental delay caused by the co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder
    Background: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by abnormal ciliary motion and impaired mucociliary clearance, leading to recurrent respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media and male infertility. Some patients also have laterality defects. We recently reported the identification of three disease-causing PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population; RSPH4A, DYX1C1 and CCNO. We have since assessed an additional Irish Traveller family with a complex phenotype involving PCD who did not have any of the previously identified PCD mutations. Case presentation: In this study we report on a family with three children with PCD and various laterality defects. In addition, one child (V:1) has mild-to-moderate developmental delay and one child has speech delay (V:2). Developmental delay is not usually associated with PCD and is likely to be caused by an additional genetic abnormality. Transmission electron microscopy showed variable inner and outer dynein arm defects. Exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense variant in CCDC103 (c.461A > C; p.His154Pro) as the most likely cause of the PCD and laterality defects in this family. However, as mutation in CCDC103 would not account for the developmental delay, array comparative genomic hybridisation was undertaken and identified a maternally inherited gain of ~1.6 Mb (chr17:34,611,352-36,248,918). Gains at this locus are associated with 17q12 duplication syndrome which includes speech and language delay. Conclusion: We report on a variable and complex phenotype caused by the co-inheritance of a single gene mutation in CCDC103 and a microduplication at 17q12, both on chromosome 17. The co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder is unusual but accounts for the spectrum of clinical features in this family. In addition, our study brings the total number of PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population to four and we suspect additional PCD genes are yet to be identified. Although, on a global scale, PCD is associated with extensive genetic heterogeneity, finding such a high number of causative PCD genes within the relatively small Irish Traveller population was unexpected.
      524Scopus© Citations 12
  • Publication
    Identification of a mutation in LARS as a novel cause of infantile hepatopathy
    Infantile hepatopathies are life-threatening liver disorders that manifest in the first few months of life. We report on a consanguineous Irish Traveller family that includes six individuals presenting with acute liver failure in the first few months of life. Additional symptoms include anaemia, renal tubulopathy, developmental delay, seizures, failure to thrive and deterioration of liver function with minor illness. The multisystem manifestations suggested a possible mitochondrial basis to the disorder. However, known causes of childhood liver failure and mitochondrial disease were excluded in this family by biochemical, metabolic and genetic analyses. We aimed to identify the underlying risk gene using homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. SNP homozygosity mapping identified a candidate locus at 5q31.3–q33.1. Whole exome sequencing identified 1 novel homozygous missense mutation within the 5q31.3–q33.1 candidate region that segregated with the hepatopathy. The candidate mutation is located in the LARS gene which encodes a cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase enzyme responsible for exclusively attaching leucine to its cognate tRNA during protein translation. Knock-down of LARS in HEK293 cells did not impact on mitochondrial function even when the cells were put under physiological stress. The molecular studies confirm the findings of the patients' biochemical and genetic analyses which show that the hepatopathy is not a mitochondrial-based dysfunction problem, despite clinical appearances. This study highlights the clinical utility of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing in diagnosing recessive liver disorders. It reports mutation of a cytoplasmic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase enzyme as a possible novel cause of infantile hepatopathy and underscores the need to consider mutations in LARS in patients with liver disease and multisystem presentations.
      785Scopus© Citations 74