The effect of a group motor skills programme on the participation and movement ability of children with developmental coordination disorder

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Title: The effect of a group motor skills programme on the participation and movement ability of children with developmental coordination disorder
Authors: Morton, Caitriona
Advisor: Cusack, Tara
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/6811
Date: 2015
Abstract: Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the levels of change in participation and movement ability in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) following attendance at a community-based group motor skills intervention programme.Relevance: Children with DCD participate and enjoy active hobbies less than their peers (Jarus et al., 2011), and are at risk of overweight and obesity (Rivillis et al., 2011). DCD presents in 6% of school-aged children (American Psychiatric Association, 2000), who are frequently treated in community-based groups (Hung & Pang 2010). The effects of group motor skills interventions on participation are unknown.Participants: Thirty children aged 7-10 years with DCD, without other physical or intellectual impairment, suitable for group therapy, were recruited from the Health Service Executive (HSE) Dublin South West community area and the Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght. Ethical permission to undertake this study was gained from University College Dublin (UCD) and the Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght.Methods: Participants were randomly allocated into intervention (n=15) or control (n=15) groups and were assessed using the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE) and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC). Intervention was a physiotherapist-led group motor skills programme, one hour weekly for 10 weeks.Analysis: SPSS was used to perform nonparametric testing for between-group (Mann-Whitney U) and within-group analysis (Wilcoxon-signed rank) following intervention. The study was sufficiently powered, with 26 children being required to demonstrate treatment effect.Results: Following intervention participation intensity improved significantly between groups (p=0.01), and remained significantly improved from baseline at 8 months post intervention (p=0.01) in the intervention group. Motor performance improved significantly between groups (p=0.01) and also remained significantly improved from baseline at 8 months post intervention in the intervention group (p=0.005).Conclusion: A specific 10 week group motor skills intervention improved participation and motor performance in children with DCD, with results maintained at 8 months.
Type of material: Master Thesis
Publisher: University College Dublin. School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Population Science
Qualification Name: M.Sc.
Copyright (published version): 2015 the author
Keywords: ChildrenDevelopmental Coordination DisorderExerciseMovement AbilityParticipationPhysiotherapy
Other versions: http://dissertations.umi.com/ucd:10037
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science Theses

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