Now showing 1 - 10 of 24
  • Publication
    'I'd prefer to stay at home but I don't have a choice': Meeting Older People's Preference for Care: Policy, but what about practice?
    (University College Dublin. School of Social Policy, Social Work and Social Justice, 2016-06-03) ; ; ;
    Background: Research indicates that most older people would prefer to live in their own homes and have support services provided to enable them to do so for as long as possible (Barry, 2010). However, there is an evident tension between this objective and the promotion of 'ageing in place', with the consequent heavy reliance on the Nursing Home Support Scheme (NHSS) in the Irish context (Donnelly and O¿Loughlin, 2015). This study set out to explore the perspectives and experiences of social workers in Republic of Ireland working with older people to identify issues/barriers in accessing community supports and to examine older people's involvement in decision-making, including those with a cognitive impairment/dementia. Methods: A mixed methods study design was adapted and the study consisted of two phases: Phase 1 consisted of an on-line survey of social workers using Survey Monkey. Phase 2 consisted of in-depth semi-structured telephone interviews with at least two social workers from each Community Health Office area. Results: Geographical inconsistencies were revealed in social workers ability to access community supports and clear tensions were found as home supports are only delivered within the framework of what is available. A growing emphasis on responding only to those with the most severe level of need, coupled with increased budgetary constraints, means that little or no support can be accessed through home help services to assist older people with domestic tasks.Social workers also reported that many older people with a mental health issue and/or dementia were excluded from decision-making processes related to their care. Conclusions: Older people's preference for receiving care and support in their home and community is not being realised often resulting in unnecessary or premature admission to nursing home care.
      1866
  • Publication
    Ethics and Ethical Decision-Making in Adult Safeguarding Practice
    (2019-10-15)
    Invited Keynote presentation to HSE National Safeguarding Office Annual Learning Forum.
      510
  • Publication
    Are you experiencing Carer Harm? Understanding Carer Harm: Dementia
    (University College Dublin and Family Carers Ireland, 2023-03-27)
    If you are a family carer, ask yourself: Does the person I care for behave in a way that causes me physical injury, emotional pain, or other kind of harm? In my engagement with professionals and organisations, is my coping capacity and need for support recognized and responded to? Carer Harm is where a family carer experiences intentional or unintentional harm from the child/adult they are trying to support. This leaflet may be useful to carers of people living with dementia.
      88
  • Publication
    'It Took a Leap of Faith.' Care and Connect: A Model for Practitioner Research in Ireland
     Irish social work has been slow to develop a research culture and professional structure to support research capacity. International literature suggests that one of the major reasons for the lack of research activity amongst social work practitioners is the absence of collaborative links between university based researchers and social work practitioners in the field (March and Fisher 2005; Shaw 2003:2005; Gibbs 2001). In 2006, senior staff from Tallaght Hospital, Dublin and the School of Social Work and Social Policy, Trinity College Dublin, recognised the need for a strategic approach for the promotion of research capacity and activity amongst social work practitioners. This paper discusses an academic/hospital partnership project "Care and Connect", that sought to explore the opportunities for developing practice based research in a health care setting in Dublin.    
      396
  • Publication
    Adult Safeguarding and People Living with Dementia in Nursing Homes
    While there has been an increased focus on ageing in place in the Irish context, for some people, including people living with dementia (PLWD), nursing home care may be required to adequately meet their care needs as their dementia progresses and care needs increase. Nursing homes are the homes of many PLWD who, despite their frailty and health problems (including dementia), should be supported to enjoy a good quality of life, maintain, and develop relationships, and contribute to society (ADI, 2013).
      563
  • Publication
    Care Planning Meetings with Older People: Issues for Policy, Social Work Practice and Patient Participation Symposium on Decision-Making Practices in Gerontological Social Work ESWRA 2019, Leuven
    (University College Dublin, 2019-04-11)
    In recent years there have been national and international policy advances around capacity and decision-making and an apparent burgeoning human rights-based approach to the issue all of which have the potential to impact on the experiences of older people. There is little evidence however on whether these policies and principles are being translated into gerontological social work practice and whether traditional paternalistic approaches to decision-making are being challenged within our professional social justice remit. Although Care-Planning Meetings (CPMs) are an increasingly common part of gerontological social work within multidisciplinary teams (MDTs), it is uncertain how, and by whom, the voice and wishes of older people, including those with a cognitive impairment, are given due priority. In addition, there is little professional guidance on how to best plan and facilitate CPMs for older patients with cognitive and communication deficits and other often complex needs. An added challenge is the wide, often diverse, and conflicting range of perspectives held by health and social care professionals and other family members who may be involved in the decision-making process. The purpose of this presentation is to draw on best practices within the research literature as well empirical research on CPMs with older people carried out in the Irish context. This research highlights considerable variability in how older people participate and are involved in decision-making around their care. The findings show that family dynamics and existing relationships can also play a role in how older people participate and are involved. The facilitators and barriers to effective participation and decision-making for older people are considered and best practice guidelines for social workers in CPMs will be discussed which could help promote an individualised approach to participation that best reflects the older person’s will and preferences.
      142
  • Publication
    Carer Harm: Best Practice Considerations for Professionals
    (University College Dublin and Family Carers Ireland, 2023-03-27)
    The information and guidance in this document is based on a small research project that involved interviews with 9 family carers who have experienced carer harm as well as interviews and focus groups with a range of professionals. This document was co-designed using a World Café methodology and by drawing on the emerging research findings. The information does not relate to the experiences of all family carers. For further information on this project, please contact Dr Sarah Donnelly, Assistant Professor of Social Work, School of Social Policy, Social Work and Social Justice, UCD: sarah.donnelly@ucd.ie
      140
  • Publication
    Are you experiencing Carer Harm? Understanding Carer Harm
    (University College Dublin and Family Carers Ireland, 2023-03-27)
    If you are a family carer, ask yourself: Does the person I care for behave in a way that causes me physical injury, emotional pain, or other kind of harm? In my engagement with professionals and organisations, is my coping capacity and need for support recognized and responded to? Carer Harm is where a family carer experiences intentional or unintentional harm from the child/adult they are trying to support. This leaflet may be useful to any family carer experiencing carer harm.
      67
  • Publication
    Speaking Up About Adult Harm: Options for Policy and Practice in the Irish Context
    (University College Dublin, 2018-03) ;
    Current mechanisms for responding to the prevention and the protection of adults at risk of abuse in Ireland can be described as ad hoc and reactionary. For example, media reports exposing cases of abuse and neglect, such as Leas Cross and Áras Attracta, have resulted in the introduction of new safeguarding policies and inspection regulations. Whilst the current measures in place to identify and prevent harm and potential harm to adults at risk offer some protection, it is evident that deeply embedded resistance to cultural change within institutions and organisations demand that safeguarding procedures need to be placed on a statutory basis to ensure the safeguarding process is applied in a consistent and effective way.
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  • Publication
    How are people with dementia involved in care-planning and decision-making? An Irish social work perspective
    In recent years, there have been national and international policy advances around capacity and decision-making and an apparent burgeoning rights-based approach to the issue, all of which have the potential to impact on the experience for people with dementia in Ireland. There is little evidence however on whether these policies and principles are being translated into practice and whether traditional paternalistic approaches to decision-making are being challenged. To gain insight into current practice, research was undertaken with social workers working with older people in Ireland; reporting on the involvement of people living with dementia in care-planning processes. Data collection included a mixed method approach; an on-line survey of social workers from across the country who reported on their open caseload during the month of June 2015 (N = 38 social workers reporting on the experiences of 788 older people, of which 39% of older people had a formal diagnosis of dementia). In addition, semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with social workers working in the nine Community Health Organisation areas (N = 21). Findings show that people with dementia were high users of social work services, accounting for 44.5% of the client group. Social workers reported that there were no standardised approaches to how Health and Social Care Professionals involved people with dementia in care planning and decision-making. Overall, people with dementia were more likely to be excluded from decision-making processes due to (i) assumptions that they lacked capacity, (ii) family members preferences that the person was not involved, (iii) communication difficulties, (iv) time constraints, (v) little or no opportunity given or (vi) the person delegated decision-making to others. Good practices were identified through multidisciplinary team approaches and formal care planning meetings. This research highlights variability in how people with dementia participate in decision-making around their care. It sheds light on existing barriers which challenge the full implementation of the Irish Assisted Decision-Making legislation; highlighting the need for appropriate guidance and education for Health and Social Care Professionals. The findings also show that family dynamics and existing relationships can play a role in how people with dementia participate and are involved. To ensure consistent opportunities for participation, effective practices and approaches to supporting the participation of people living with dementia in care planning needs to be developed and rolled out in all care settings through increased training and adoption of standardised approaches.
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