Now showing 1 - 10 of 46
  • Publication
    Seeking multiple perspectives : a qualitative investigation of ADHD in Ireland
    The overall aim of this research was to develop an understanding of the experiences of children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) in Ireland. Fifteen 7-12 year old boys with a diagnosis of AD/HD were the primary participants in this research. Eighteen of their parents/guardians and seventeen of their teachers also took part. Participants from each group took part in semi-structured interviews. Findings suggest that the experience of AD/HD had a significant impact on the lives of those affected by it. Parents and teachers described the difficulties in managing the needs of the child with AD/HD alongside the needs of the whole family and the other children in the class respectively. Children reported various challenges at home and at school, with the majority of children in this study reporting a particular dislike of school. All three groups of participants report limited understanding of the condition and commented on the stigma associated with AD/HD. Finally despite the challenges and demands of the AD/HD experience in Ireland each group of participants reported positive experiences and had an optimistic viewpoint. Children in particular described overly positive social experiences which are at odds with parent and teacher reports. It is possible that this reflects a positive illusory bias.
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  • Publication
    Viewer versus Film: Exploring Interaction Effects of Immersion and Cognitive Stance on the Heart Rate and Self-Reported Engagement of Viewers of Short Films
    An immersive viewing environment compels the viewer to attend more to the film. Such immersion is associated with increased emotional experience in the viewer. Thus, for an emotional film, an immersive environment should arouse more intense emotional engagement than a less immersive environment. Viewers can actively regulate their cognitive engagement with the film. For example, viewers can remind themselves it's not real, or conversely, they can make extra efforts to empathise with the character. The aim of the study was to explore participant's cognitive engagement with film and how this interacts with the immersiveness of the viewing environment. Self-report measures of emotional arousal and engagement were higher for participants who viewed the films in a more immersive environment and those who were instructed to take an involved stance
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  • Publication
    Using implicit measures to evaluate mental health stigma and atitudes to help-seeking
    Aims: The paper introduces and describes the use of implicit measures of attitude in two separate studies.  The aim of the first study was to explore children's and adolescents, (10 to 16 years) stigmatizing responses towards hypothetical peers with either ADHD or depression.  The aim of the second was to investigate whether a brief on-line intervention could change young adults, (18 to 25 years) attitudes towards help-seeking for mental health problems. Conclusions: Implicit measures may prove to be a useful tool for researchers who are interested in stigma associated with mental health problems in young people and their treatment.  Lessons learned from the use of implicit measures in these studies will be highlighted.
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  • Publication
    Le Chéile: Well-being of Students in Colleges of Further Education in Ireland
    The main aims of this research were to explore the well being of young adults attending colleges of further education in Ireland, in particular the relationship between chronic health conditions, stigma and well-being. Participants were 288 students from Colleges of Further Education in Ireland. Of these 123 (43%) reported living with a chronic physical and/or a mental health condition. Students with chronic health conditions had lower levels of social functioning than their healthy peers. Participants with high levels of stigma for help-seeking reported lower levels of well being and lower general health. Students with chronic health conditions reported significantly lower levels of self esteem than their peers. These findings highlight the importance of providing support to young people with chronic health conditions as they cope with the demands of early adulthood and college life.
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  • Publication
    Using implicit measures to evaluate mental health stigma and attitudes to help-seeking
    Aims: The paper introduces and describes the use of implicit measures of attitude in two separate studies.  The aim of the first study was to explore children's and adolescents' (10 to 16 years) stigmatizing responses towards hypothetical peers with either ADHD or depression.  The aim of the second was to investigate whether a brief on-line intervention could change young adults' (18 to 25 years) attitudes towards help-seeking for mental health problems. Methods: Implicit measures, such as the Implicit Associations Test (IAT) do not require research participants to overtly express their beliefs.  They are used where there is a high risk that research participants will offer socially desirable responses about stereotypes and prejudices. In the first study, an adapted IAT, in conjunction with questionnaires, was used to measure attitudes towards a vignette describing a peer who had ADHD or depression.  In the second study, the Single Category IAT was used to measure young adults' attitudes towards professional help-seeking for mental health problems. Results: The findings showed that young people were more stigmatising towards peers with mental health problems and treatment seeking on implicit compared to explicit measures. The patterns of responses between the measures highlights the value of using implicit measures to enhance our understanding of such phenomena.  Conclusions: Implicit measures may prove to be a useful tool for researchers who are interested in stigma associated with mental health problems in young people and their treatment.  Lessons learned from the use of implicit measures in these studies will be highlighted.
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  • Publication
    Health Literacy of COVID-19 and Compliance with Precautionary Measures: A Cross-Sectional Study in Adolescents and Young Adults in Ireland
    The COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with an ‘infodemic’, and young people have reported difficulties dealing with COVID-19-related information. The present cross-sectional study aimed to explore health knowledge related to COVID-19 and accessing relevant information as aspects of health literacy in a cohort of adolescents and young adults residing in Ireland. It also aimed to explore COVID-19-related concerns and levels of compliance with precautionary measures. Data were collected from young people (n = 1009) aged 12–25 years old through an online anonymous survey. Our findings highlight that young people possessed sufficient knowledge about COVID-19 transmission routes and adhered to most precautionary measures. Young people believed that they were moderately likely to contract COVID-19 and highly likely to survive COVID-19 should they get infected. However, these patterns seemed to differ between adolescents and young adults as well as between participants living with and without a chronic health condition (CHC). These findings have implications that can inform knowledge on youth health literacy and health-related attitudes that go beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. Contextual factors such as country context, age group, gender, and the absence or presence of a CHC are important characteristics to consider when designing public health awareness campaigns targeting a global health crisis.
      138
  • Publication
    The effects of electrical muscle stimulation training in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease population – a pilot study
    Exercise training is currently advocated as a therapeutic modality for improving the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) -including peripheral muscle dysfunction, decreased exercise tolerance, weight loss, depletion of muscle mass and muscle strength and poor health status. Owing to a limited cardiopulmonary reserve, COPD patients are frequently physically unable to tolerate sufficient training intensities which would afford them with the benefits associated with conventional exercise training interventions. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) appears to have a limited demand on ventilatory requirements and dyspnoea, and may be a promising exercise training alternative for patients with COPD.
      359
  • Publication
    Bridging the gap between theory and practice in creativity education
    This paper presents the findings of an inter-disciplinary literature review that seeks to provide an evidence-base from which discipline specific and cross-disciplinary modules aimed at nurturing and developing creativity can be developed. The review focuses on identifying theoretical frameworks guiding the pedagogy of creativity as well as on the environmental conditions that are associated with greater levels of creativity in student learning.  The paper will present an overview of key theoretical frameworks (e.g. investment theory and design thinking) as well as an evaluation of the empirical research on the environmental factors that have been demonstrated as influencing student creative development.  Amongst these are tolerance of and exposure to: risk, cycles of divergent and convergent thinking, an active learner-centred approach to education, rewarding originality, learning from failure and experimentation and an acceptance of diversity.  The paper will also discuss methods of assessment and their influence on student creativity.  The paper will offer a critical reflection on our understanding of the pedagogy of creativity and point to directions for future work in this important area. 
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  • Publication
    Study Protocol: Prospective, observational, cohort study of COVID-19 in General Practice (North Dublin COVID-19 Cohort [‘ANTICIPATE’] Study)
    Background: It is accepted that COVID-19 will have considerable long-term consequences, especially on people’s mental and physical health and wellbeing. Although the impacts on local communities have been immense, there remains little data on long term outcomes among patients with COVID-19 who were managed in general practice and primary care. This study seeks to address this knowledge gap by examining how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the medium and long-term health and wellbeing of patients attending general practice, especially their mental health and wellbeing. Methods: The study will be conducted at 12 general practices in the catchment area of the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, i.e. the North Dublin area, an area which has experienced an especially high COVID-19 incidence. Practices will be recruited from the professional networks of the research team. A member of the general practice team will be asked to identify patients of the practice who attended the practice after 16/3/20 with a confirmed or presumptive diagnosis of COVID-19 infection. Potential participants will be provided with information on the study by the clinical team. Data will be collected on those patients who consent to participate by means of an interviewer-administered questionnaire and review of clinical records. Data will be collected on health (especially mental health) and wellbeing, quality of life, health behaviours, health service utilisation, and wider impacts of COVID-19 at recruitment and at two follow up time points (6, 12 months). Deliverables: The project involves collaboration with Ireland’s Health Service Executive, Ireland East Hospital Group, and the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin. The study is funded by the Health Research Board. Findings will inform health policies that attenuate the adverse impacts of COVID-19 on population mental health and health generally.
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  • Publication
    Your Youth Health Project: Exploring the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health and well-being of young people in Ireland. A report of findings for the Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown region
    Your Youth Health project is a nationwide survey developed by UCD School of Psychology with the support of Healthy Ireland Fund and Pobal. We aimed to gain insight into the psychological well-being and the mental health needs of young people aged 12-25 years old during this unprecedented public health crisis. The Dún-Laoghaire Rathdown report presents findings from young people living in the area at the time of the pandemic.
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