Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Effect of β-glucanase and β-xylanase enzyme supplemented barley diets on nutrient digestibility, growth performance and expression of intestinal nutrient transporter genes in finisher pigs
    The study investigated the effect of dietary supplementation of an enzyme mix (β-glucanase and β-xylanase) to barley based diets that had different chemical compositions achieved through different agronomical conditions on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and intestinal nutrient transporters. Ninety-six pigs (44.7 kg (SD 4.88)) were assigned to one of four dietary treatments. The treatments were as follows: (T1) low quality barley diet, (T2) low quality barley diet supplemented with β-glucanase and β-xylanase enzyme supplement, (T3) high quality barley diet and (T4) high quality barley diet supplemented with β-glucanase and β-xylanase enzyme supplement. The inclusion of barley was 500 g/kg. There was an interaction between barley type and enzyme supplementation on average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) (P < 0.05). Pigs offered the low quality barley diet supplemented with enzymes had an increase in both ADG and ADFI compared to the low quality barley diet only. However, there was no response to enzyme inclusion in the high quality barley diet. Pigs offered the low quality barley diet with enzymes had a higher coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility (CATTD) of gross energy (GE) compared to the low quality barley diet only (P < 0.05). However, the increase in the high quality barley diet with enzyme supplementation was not as great as with the low quality barley diet. Pigs offered the low quality barley had an upregulation in the expression of the ghrelin gene (GHRL) in the jejunum compared to pigs offered the high quality barley diet (P < 0.05). There was a barley × enzyme interaction observed for the expression of the cluster of differentiation gene (CD36) in the duodenum and the peptide transporter 1 gene (PEPT1/SLC15A1) and sodium-glucose linked transporter 1 gene (SGLT1/SLC5A1) in the ileum (P < 0.01). Pigs offered the high quality barley diet with enzymes had increased expression of CD36, PEPT1/SLC15A1 and SGLT1/SLC5A1 compared to the high quality barley diet alone. However the low quality barley diet with enzymes down regulated the expression of CD36, PEPT1/SLC15A1 and SGLT1/SLC5A1 compared to the low quality barley diet alone. In conclusion, offering a low quality barley diet supplemented with an enzyme mix improved ADG, ADFI and nutrient digestibility as well as modifying the expression of CD36, PEPT1/SLC15A1 and SGLT1/SLC5A1. The inclusion of an enzyme mix to the high quality barley diet improved nutrient digestibility and caused an upregulation in the expression of CD36, PEPT1/SLC15A1 and SGLT1/SLC5A1 but it did not improve animal performance.
    Scopus© Citations 19  470
  • Publication
    The effect of 25‐hydroxyvitamin D3 and phytase inclusion on pig performance, bone parameters and pork quality in finisher pigs
    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of supplementing both phytase and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D₃) on pig performance, nutrient digestibility, carcass characteristics, bone parameters and pork quality in finisher pigs. The experimental design was a 2 × 2 factorial comprising of four dietary treatments. One hundred and twenty pigs (60 male, 60 female) were blocked according to live weight and sex and allocated to the following dietary treatments: low P (4.81 g/kg) diet (basal) (T1); low P diet + phytase (T2); low P diet + 25-OH-D₃ (T3) and low P diet + phytase + 25-OH-D₃ (T4). Pigs supplemented with phytase had a lower average daily feed intake (ADFI) (2.45 kg vs. 2.59 kg; p < 0.05) and lower feed conversion ratio (FCR) (2.74 kg/kg vs. 2.85 kg/kg; p < 0.05) compared to pigs offered the nonphytase diets. Pigs offered phytase diets had a higher (p < 0.05) coefficient of apparent total tract digestibility (CATTD) of ash, phosphorous (P) and calcium (Ca) compared with pigs offered the nonphytase supplemented diets. Pigs offered the 25-OH-D3 diets had a higher CATTD of N and ash. Pigs offered the phytase diets had increased (p < 0.05) bone DM, ash, Ca, P and density compared to the nonphytase diets. There was a significant interaction (p < 0.05) between phytase and 25-OH-D3 on cook loss. Pigs offered 25-OH-D3 had increased cook loss over the basal diet; however, there was no effect on cook loss when phytase and 25-OH-D3 were offered in combination compared to the phytase only diet. Pigs offered 25-OH-D3 exhibited higher (p < 0.05) Warner Bratzler shear force values and lower (p < 0.05) pork lightness (L*) surface colorimeter values. In conclusion, there was no benefit to offering a combination of phytase and 25-OH-D3 on pig performance, bone parameters or pork quality.
    Scopus© Citations 19  514
  • Publication
    Potential of a fucoidan-rich Ascophyllum nodosum extract to reduce Salmonella shedding and improve gastrointestinal health in weaned pigs naturally infected with Salmonella
    Background. Dietary supplementation with a fucoidan-rich Ascophyllum nodosum extract (ANE), possessing an in vitro anti-Salmonella Typhimurium activity could be a promising on-farm strategy to control Salmonella infection in pigs. The objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate the anti-S. Typhimurium activity of ANE (containing 46.6% fucoidan, 18.6% laminarin, 10.7% mannitol, 4.6% alginate) in vitro, and; 2) compare the effects of dietary supplementation with ANE and Zinc oxide (ZnO) on growth performance, Salmonella shedding and selected gut parameters in naturally infected pigs. This was established post-weaning (newly weaned pig experiment) and following regrouping of post-weaned pigs and experimental re-infection with S. Typhimurium (challenge experiment). Results. In the in vitro assay, increasing ANE concentrations led to a linear reduction in S. Typhimurium counts (P <  0.05). In the newly weaned pig experiment (12 replicates/treatment), high ANE supplementation increased gain to feed ratio, similar to ZnO supplementation, and reduced faecal Salmonella counts on d 21 compared to the low ANE and control groups (P <  0.05). The challenge experiment included thirty-six pigs from the previous experiment that remained on their original dietary treatments (control and high ANE groups with the latter being renamed to ANE group) apart from the ZnO group which transitioned onto a control diet on d 21 (ZnO-residual group). These dietary treatments had no effect on performance, faecal scores, Salmonella shedding or colonic and caecal Salmonella counts (P > 0.05). ANE supplementation decreased the Enterobacteriaceae counts compared to the control. Enterobacteriaceae counts were also reduced in the ZnO-residual group compared to the control (P <  0.05). ANE supplementation decreased the expression of interleukin 22 and transforming growth factor beta 1 in the ileum compared to the control (P <  0.05).
      249Scopus© Citations 4