Now showing 1 - 10 of 49
  • Publication
    Healthcare Activism, Marketization, and the Collective Good
    (Oxford University Press, 2021-09) ;
    This introductory chapter charts the book’s trajectory by engaging with three interlinked key dynamics of contemporary healthcare—marketization, digitalization, and individualization. It draws on several theoretical frameworks to conceptualize notions of the common, collective, or public good and to consider how healthcare activism may play into defining and defending the collective good when faced with the outlined societal, economic, and scientific dynamics. Presenting contemporary examples from the Covid-19 pandemic, the chapter argues that the way activists define and defend the collective good can only fully be understood by grasping how this good is shaped by other, often more dominant, stakeholders in healthcare: governmental institutions, professional experts, scientists, and private industry—the latter being a focal point of concern for this current volume.
      9
  • Publication
    Adding Value to International Business Education: An Irish-American Road Map to Service Learning
    This article summarises the experience of two undergraduate schools of business, one in Ireland and one in the United States, in developing an international service learning programme for study-abroad students. Working from an already existing partnership, the schools established an academically-based programme with a support structure for students administered by both institutions. Practical considerations required the Irish partner institution establish its own service learning programme and that the United States partner institution assist in that through a visiting professorship. In the process of this collaborative effort the actors were reminded of the importance of academic and strategic compatibility; senior administrative support; making room for cultural differences; and listening to the student voice. This case is presented as an example of the lessons learned along the road of achieving the combined benefits of study abroad and service learning.
      359
  • Publication
    Does hype create irreversibilities? Affective circulation and market investments in digital health
    (Sage Publications, 2017) ;
    This paper draws from two conceptual lenses - the sociology of expectations and market studies - to investigate the relationship between technology hype and market investments: which promises and expectations surround hype and how they come together to shape actors' investments in an emerging market. We address this question through analysing a contemporary hype in a technology marketing context: digital healthcare. Our aim is to trace: how market actors create, support and evaluate a market hype; how hype and market investments are related, and whether hype contributes to irreversibilities in shaping emerging market forms and categories. Our study indicates that hypes contribute tangibly to producing the market, not least by channelling financial, symbolic and material market investments. Further, by highlighting how socio-economic, technological and policy promises become affectively loaded through circulation, we add a novel dimension to existing insights into the socio-cognitive construction of markets. We caution technology marketers, policy makers and investors against blindly following technology hype, especially when it encourages companies to engage in market investment that is unhinged from broader systems and societal, ethical or economic concerns.
      409
  • Publication
    Market mash ups: The process of combinatorial market innovation
    (Elsevier, 2021-01-01) ;
    This paper investigates market innovation that takes place at the intersection of previously weakly connected markets. Based on a longitudinal study of the development of the digital therapeutics market, we delineate the concept of combinatorial market innovation as a market innovation process that is characterized by the deliberate synthesis of market subprocesses from two (or more) existing markets. We develop a conceptualization of combinatorial market innovation related to five market subprocesses (configuring exchange agents, qualifying offerings, fashioning modes of exchange, generating market representations, and establishing market norms). Focusing on how these processes interact, we identify three distinct types of intertwinement – sequential interrelation, mutual reinforcement, and interference. We also reflect on the need for market innovation studies to more strongly consider overlaps and adjacencies between markets and market systems.
      186
  • Publication
    Boundary resource interactions in solution networks
    Purpose: This study aims to explore the interactions between two different and potentially complementary boundary resources in coordinating solution networks in a digital platform context: boundary spanners (those individuals who span interorganizational boundaries) and boundary interfaces (the devices that help coordinate interfirm relationships, e.g. electronic data interchanges, algorithms or chatbots). Design/methodology/approach: The authors conducted a multiple case study of three firms using digital platforms to coordinate solution networks in the information communication technology and lighting facility industries. Data were collected from 30 semi-structured interviews, which are complemented by secondary data. Findings: As task complexity increases, smarter digital interfaces are adopted. When the intelligence level of interfaces is low or moderate, they are only used as tools by boundary spanners or to support boundary spanners’ functions. When the intelligence level of interfaces is high or very high, boundary spanners design the interfaces and let them perform tasks autonomously. They are also sometimes employed to complement interfaces’ technological limitations and customers’ limited user ability. Research limitations/implications: The industry contexts of the cases may influence the results. Qualitative case data has limited generalizability. Practical implications: This study offers a practical tool for solution providers to effectively deploy boundary employees and digital technologies to offer diverse customized solutions simultaneously. Originality: This study contributes to the solution business literature by putting forward a framework of boundary resource interactions in coordinating solution networks in a digital platform context. It contributes to the boundary spanning literature by revealing the shifting functions of boundary spanners and boundary interfaces.
    Scopus© Citations 2  56
  • Publication
    Promissories and pharmaceutical patents: agencing markets through public narratives
    (Taylor and Francis, 2015-07-25) ;
    We investigate a body of data emanating from the 2008/2009 EU Pharmaceutical Sector Inquiry, interpreting the collection of submissions to it as a concerted attempt at market innovation that becomes fraught with challenge and contest. In the pharmaceutical market, interests associated with patient concerns, government budgets, global 'Big Pharma,' and local 'small pharma' coalesce and compete with patent law, technological innovation and drug lifecycles. Our research question is: What role do market narratives play in shaping the market's socio-technical agencements? By introducing market narratives, we focus on the performative effects of temporality and iteration. Our argument is that by acting as (contested) promissories, market narratives contribute to 'agencing' a market, such that actors are engaged continually in juxtaposing and adjusting their representations of it and putting in place those socio-technical agencements that make the markets resemble those narratives. Narrating a market becomes a collective and iterative task of equipping actors to shape the markets that they desire.
    Scopus© Citations 19  336
  • Publication
    Healthcare Activism, Marketization, and the Collective Good
    (Oxford University Press, 2021-10) ;
    This chapter engages with three key dynamics of contemporary healthcare - digitalization, marketization and individualization. It draws on several theoretical frameworks to conceptualize the notion of collective good and to consider how healthcare activism may play into defining and defending the collective good when faced with the outlined societal, economic, and scientific dynamics. Presenting contemporary examples from the Covid-19 pandemic, the chapter argues that the way activists define and defend the collective good can only fully be understood by grasping how this good is shaped by other, often more dominant, stakeholders in healthcare: governmental institutions, professional experts, scientists, and private industry – the latter being a focal point of concern for this current volume.
      1598
  • Publication
    Markets and institutional fields: foundational concepts and a research agenda
    (Springer, 2021-05-15) ;
    We borrow the notion of field from institutional theory to think through how markets and their ‘outsides’–or at least one particular manifestation of an ‘outside’–stand in a dynamic and interactive relationship. We distinguish the field and the market in terms of issues versus exchange and identity versus position. We argue that the lack of clarity as to how fields and markets differ, relate, overlap, and are bounded, jeopardizes our ability to address important societal debates concerning the roles of markets within and across other areas of social life. It also hinders a consolidation of insights across different approaches to studying markets, even though researchers from different disciplines often address similar concerns. Key questions for which both conceptual and analytical clarity are essential include how markets and their ‘outsides’ (here: fields) intersect; whether and how diverse sets of actors interact, work, and migrate between fields and markets; and what dynamics may be observable between field and market. We provide four illustrative examples of field/market relationships and a theoretical, methodological, and empirical research agenda for future research into markets and their ‘outsides’.
    Scopus© Citations 5  18
  • Publication
    COVID-19 and techno-solutionism: responsibilization without contextualization?
    Since the onset of the pandemic, and underpinned by often promissory undertones in policy discourse, an array of technological solutions have come to be regarded as privileged modes of intervention to curb the spread of COVID-19. Yet all too often the policies around COVID technologies have suffered from a spectrum of shortcomings or ‘fallacies’ (Jasanoff et al., 2021), which, notwithstanding the distinctiveness of each country’s policies, have characterized the pandemic response of most (liberal) democracies globally. In particular, the rollout of COVID interventions in many countries has tended to replicate a mode of intervention based on ‘technological fixes’ and ‘silver-bullet solutions’, which tend to erase contextual factors and marginalize other rationales, values, and social functions that do not explicitly support technology-based innovation efforts (Jasanoff et al., 2021). As Hill et al. (2022) in this Special Section argue, driving public health policy through such techno-solutionism only risks exacerbating existing social inequalities and mistrust in governments.
    Scopus© Citations 10  56
  • Publication
    Interpersonal influence strategies in complex B2B sales and the socio-cognitive construction of relationship value
    (Elsevier, 2015-08) ;
    The investigation of how exactly salespeople create value at the individual level of interaction is still incomplete. While there have been lively debates on value creation and co-creation processes at the organizational level in the business marketing literature, researchers have paid much less attention to the fact that such processes almost always start at the interpersonal level of buyer-seller interactions. Through utilizing a symbolic interactionist perspective and the ethnographic research method of shadowing, the present study moves research insights into value creation in sales forward by depicting the detailed activities and tactics that influence customers' value perceptions during the sales encounter. We complement the sales influence literature with three additional tactics: disrupt, reassure and dedicate. We also expand the framework of value creation in sales interactions by identifying three value strategies that change, strengthen or expand customer value perceptions through different socio-cognitive mechanisms.
    Scopus© Citations 54  1093