Now showing 1 - 10 of 12
  • Publication
    Acute physiological responses to electrical muscle stimulation in a spinal cord injured man – a case study
    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is a leading cause of death in populations with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) and is contributed to by a lack of opportunities to engage in physical activity as well as limited motor function [1]. Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) has been suggested as a novel CV training tool to alleviate this problem associated with SCI by increasing peak oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) [2]. However the use of FES is limited by its effect on muscle fatigue as well as the need for specialist equipment and training. Our research group have devised an electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) training device which has improved CV health in obese and chronic heart failure populations [3], whose symptoms are akin to those of SCI patients with CV symptoms. These results warrant further investigation into this system`s effects on the CV health of people with SCI.
      346
  • Publication
    The effects of a neuromuscular electrical stimulation training intervention on physiological measures in a spinal cord injured male : a case study
    (Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists, 2010-04) ; ; ; ;
    Background: People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are exposed to the development of comorbidities secondary to a decreased ability to exercise and pathological complications. Aerobic exercise has been advocated as a means of preventing the development of these illnesses. Previous research has indicated that functional electrical stimulation (FES) provides an appropriate aerobic stimulus in an SCI population to provide cardiovascular fitness gains. However, FES devices are time consuming for both clients and medical staff in a rehabilitation and home setting with devices often expensive. Our research group have developed a novel neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) system which may provide an alternative to FES and elicit a similar response. Methods: A 40 year old male with a T6 incomplete SCI, undertook 6 weeks of NMES training for one hour, five days per week. Pre and post intervention measures include a treadmill VO2 peak test, a DXA scan and subjective feedback regarding the NMES device and training stimulus. Results: Improvements in VO2 peak, heart rate and exercise tolerance were observed with minor decreases in total body fat mass. The participant reported that the NMES was an acceptable form of cardiovascular training. Conclusion: Our pilot case study has indicated that our NMES system is capable of eliciting an aerobic training effect in people with SCI, which could potentially improve their cardiovascular fitness. Further study with a greater number of participants is warranted in this population using a similar training program.
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  • Publication
    The effects of electrical muscle stimulation training in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease population – a pilot study
    Exercise training is currently advocated as a therapeutic modality for improving the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) -including peripheral muscle dysfunction, decreased exercise tolerance, weight loss, depletion of muscle mass and muscle strength and poor health status. Owing to a limited cardiopulmonary reserve, COPD patients are frequently physically unable to tolerate sufficient training intensities which would afford them with the benefits associated with conventional exercise training interventions. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) appears to have a limited demand on ventilatory requirements and dyspnoea, and may be a promising exercise training alternative for patients with COPD.
      291
  • Publication
    A pilot investigation into the effects of electrical muscle stimulation training on physical fitness in an adult cystic fibrosis population
    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting genetic disease in caucasians. Skeletal muscle weakness and exercise intolerance is prevalent in people with cystic fibrosis. Although higher levels of fitness have been associated with better quality of well-being and improved eight year survival training among individuals with CF is limited due to fatigue, hypoxaemia and dyspnoea.Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has demonstrated improvements in muscle strength, exercise tolerance and aerobic capacity in cardiorespiratory disease populations, while having minimal impact on oxygen saturation levels and heart rate.
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  • Publication
    An investigation into the effects of electrical muscle stimulation training in type 2 diabetes mellitus : a case study
    Exercise is a vital component in the management and prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Both the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) advocate exercise as a treatment method for T2DM. However, given the benefits of engaging in physical activity, many T2DM patients are often unable to partake in physical activity secondary to complications of their diabetes or other musculoskeletal problems. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) exercise is a likely alternative for diabetic individuals who face barriers to physical activity. EMS has received much attention in recent years as a new form of inducing exercise. Banerjee and colleagues showed that prolonged EMS exercise in sedentary adults resulted in significant improvements in maximal aerobic capacity, muscle strength and capacity for physical activity.
      440
  • Publication
    A pilot investigation into the effects of electrical muscle stimulation training on physical fitness in an adult cystic fibrosis population
    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting genetic disease in Caucasians. [1] Progressive respiratory and gastro intestinal disease are the predominant clinical manifestations of the disease. As a consequence of general de-conditioning, skeletal muscle weakness and exercise intolerance is prevalent among patients with CF. [2] Although higher levels of fitness have been associated with better quality of wellbeing and eight-year survival, training among individuals with CF is limited due to fatigue, hypoxemia and dyspnoea. [3] Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) has demonstrated improvements in muscle strength, exercise tolerance and aerobic capacity in chronic cardio respiratory disease populations, while having minimal impact on heart rate (HR) and oxygen saturation levels. [4,5]
      155
  • Publication
    An investigation into the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation exercise in type 2 diabetes : a case study
    Exercise is a vital component in the management and prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Both the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) advocate exercise as a treatment method for T2D. However, given the benefits of engaging in physical activity, many T2D patients are often unable to partake in physical activity secondary to complications of their diabetes or other musculoskeletal problems. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) exercise is a likely alternative for diabetic individuals who face barriers to physical activity. NMES has received much attention in recent years as a new form of inducing exercise. The ability of NMES to stimulate innervated muscle has resulted in it’s use as a training tool for individuals without neuromuscular pathology. Banerjee and colleagues showed that prolonged NMES exercise in sedentary adults resulted in significant improvements in maximal aerobic capacity, muscle strength and capacity for physical activity. The aim of this case study was to investigate the use of NMES exercise in T2D.
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  • Publication
    An investigation into the acute effects of electrical muscle stimulation on cardiopulmonary function in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient - a pilot case study
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients commonly find it difficult to participate in conventional aerobic exercise training owing to limited cardiopulmonary reserve, excessive dyspnoea and muscle fatigue. Recent studies have shown that significant improvements in oxygen consumption can be gained post 6-week electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) training. Low frequency currents elicit a sustained and significant aerobic response and may be appropriate for COPD patients, who cannot exercise in a conventional manner. A recent study compared the acute metabolic response among COPD patients during resistance training and EMS, using a tetanic frequency of 75 Hertz (Hz), however no investigations have reported on the acute effects of EMS on cardiopulmonary function in a COPD population, using low frequency stimulation current.
      284
  • Publication
    The effects of an electrical muscle stimulation training intervention on physiological measures in a spinal cord injury male
    Participation in aerobic exercise activity is considered necessary for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reduce the potential development of common co-morbidities associated with SCI such as cardiovascular (CV) disease, reduced bone mineral density (BMD), increases in body fat and decreases in lean body mass. Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) has been advocated as offering a feasible exercise regime to SCI individuals. FES studies have reported improvements in BMD, CV fitness, body composition (BC) and quality of life (QOL), however its application is limited by its effect on muscle fatigue, as well as the need for specialist equipment and training. Recently, researchers have developed a new type of electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) system, which appears to overcome the above issues. This system has improved heart rate (HR) and peak muscle oxygen consumption (VO2) within Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) patients, obese and sedentary adults [3,4]. An SCI population may benefit from a similar intervention and justifies further research into the effects this EMS system may have on SCI.
      730
  • Publication
    The physiological effects of low level electrical stimulation on short term recovery from supra maximal exercise bouts : a case study
    Inadequate recovery from short-term, high-intensity bouts of exercise can be a limiting factor to optimal sporting performance [1]. Previous research investigating recovery from intense exercise using various intervention protocols (e.g., active recovery, massage, cold and contrast water therapy, compression suits etc.) have generally found positive results when compared to passive recovery [2,3]. A recent study utilised electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) as an intervention for short-term recovery (< 1 hr) between bouts of intense exercise [4]. They concluded that EMS shows promise as an alternate recovery treatment for lowering blood lactate when compared to passive recovery.
      989