Now showing 1 - 10 of 15
  • Publication
    Review: F.K. Yegül Bathing in the Roman World (2010) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    (Cambridge University Press, 2013-10-14)
    In his preface Fikret Yegül describes his book as a general, yet generous, review of bathing in the Roman world. His fnished product, however, exceeds all such stated parameters in terms of breadth of material, chronological span and sophistication of analysis. From the outset Y. launches into an energetic, informative, and clearly indulgent, social exploration of the habit of Roman bathing; a ritual which was, by nature, integrally harnessed to the architectural framework of the bathhouse.
      292
  • Publication
    Final Report: Archaeological Excavations at Grange 2, M3 Clonee North of Kells motorway scheme
    (National Roads Authority, 2011-04) ; ;
    This is a final report of an archaeological excavation at Grange 2 which was located on the route of the M3 Navan–Kells & Kells Bypass (Archaeological Services Contract 4) of the M3 Clonee–North of Kells Motorway Scheme, County Meath. The excavation was carried out by Dr. Amanda Kelly of Irish Archaeological Consultancy Ltd on behalf of Meath County Council and the National Roads Authority. The work was carried out under Ministerial Direction No. A029/006 and National Monuments Service (NMS) Excavation Registration No. E3124 which were received from the DoEHLG in consultation with the National Museum of Ireland. The fieldwork took place between 16 June 2006 – 14 July 2006. A total area of 805m2 was opened around Grange 2 to reveal the archaeological features that were identified at the site during archaeological testing under licence 04E0925. This site is closely linked with the adjacent site of Grange 3 (Kelly 2010a) and together they create a picture of continuous activity from the middle Bronze Age through to the early medieval period (Figure 7). The excavated remains from this site and the other sites in Grange indicate that this area was the focus of activity over a prolonged period and it is probable that the place held some significance that resulted in it being revisited repeatedly.
      371
  • Publication
    Roman Bathhouses on Crete as Indicators of Cultural Transition: The Dynamics of Roman Influence
    (Institute of Classical Studies, 2013)
    The grafting of Roman mores onto local identities is a complex issue and gaps in the archaeological record u ltimately result in misleading and biased deductions. The wide variety of models for Roman integration unde rscores gradations of responsiveness and exposes subtle undulations of Romanization throughout the Empire whereby Roman presence can resonate with almost unconscious societal change, establishing patterns of minimal influence.
      465
  • Publication
    A Turkish Import in County Meath: Mediterranean Pottery on the M3
    (National Roads Authority, 2008)
    Analysis of a pottery fragment discovered on the M3 has revealed evidence of ancient trade between Ireland and the eastern Mediterranean. A sherd from the rim of an imported pottery vessel recovered from an early medieval cemetery at Collierstown 1, Co. Meath (excavated by Robert O’Hara of Archaeological Consultancy Services Ltd), has been identified recently as Phocaean Red Slip Ware (PRSW) Form 3. The type is named after a major production centre at Phocaea, in western Turkey. The Collierstown sherd comes from a vessel manufactured there some 1,500 years ago.
      270
  • Publication
    Occide, verbera, ure! 'Kill him, Flog him, Burn him Alive!' (Seneca Epistles 7); The popularity, extent and duration of Roman Spectacula on Crete
    (Philological Association 'Chrysostomos', 2011-10-08)
    Purpose-built amphitheatres, as an architectural type, have always been instantly recognisable as Roman. The amphitheatre represents an exclusively Roman architectural medium, serving as a vehicle for reinforcing Roman social order throughout provincial contexts and thereby affecting cultural transition.
      201
  • Publication
    Kouphonisi (Greece): a briefly vibrant Roman harbourage between Crete and Africa
    (CNRS Editions, 2016-10-20) ; ;
    This paper explores the dynamics leading to the establishment of a relatively prosperous Roman settlement on the islet of Kouphonisi in Crete. The settlement was clearly comparatively wealthy, judging from the range of its public buildings (including a bathhouse, theatre, aqueducts and cistern complexes) and the opulent decor of its private residences. What conditions generated such favourable economic circumstances for the inhabitants of this tiny arid islet lying in the Libyan Sea three miles off the southeastern tip of Crete? The location of the islet, which today seems remote and far-removed, is appraised in the context of its seasonal sea currents and favourable winds which facilitated its navigational connectivity with Roman markets operating in the wider Mediterranean. Already in the Hellenistic period, the islet's strategic importance was keenly recognised by the competitive cities of eastern Crete who vied for its control. However, these serendipitous circumstances, and the site's sustainability, were short lived. The settlement's economic boom (born of its strategic position along the wider sailing routes of the Mediterranean) ended abruptly and permanently in the late 4th century AD. Finally, the paper examines the possible nature of the drastic forces which may have been responsible for the settlement's abandonment, thereby signalling the beginning of a process of desertification which persists today.
      424
  • Publication
    Roman Finewares from Sector II Pyrgi, Eleutherna
    (Faculty of Letters Publications, University of Crete, 2012)
    This paper presents a small, but representative, sample of imported Roman finewares at Eleutherna, Sector II Pyrgi, and considers its implications for, or at least small contribution to, an appreciation of Imperial Rome’s earliest influence on the settlement on the acropolis of Eleutherna within its provincial context.
      226
  • Publication
    Final Report: Archaeological Excavations at Grange 5, M3 Clonee North of Kells Motorway Scheme
    (National Roads Authority, 2010-06-21) ; ;
    This is a final report of an archaeological excavation at Grange 5 which was located on the route of the M3 Navan–Kells & Kells Bypass (Archaeological Services Contract 4) of the M3 Clonee–North of Kells Motorway Scheme, County Meath. The excavation was carried out by Amanda Kelly of Irish Archaeological Consultancy Ltd on behalf of Meath County Council and the National Roads Authority. The work was carried out under Ministerial Direction No. A029/003 and National Monuments Service (NMS) Excavation Registration No. E3121 which were received from the DoEHLG in consultation with the National Museum of Ireland. The fieldwork took place between 16 – 27 November 2006. A total area of 850m2 was opened around Grange 5 to reveal the archaeological features that were identified at the site during archaeological testing under licence 04E0925. Five pits, two possible postholes and two curvilinear ditches were identified at Grange 5. One of the pits was dated to the early Bronze Age but appeared to be in isolation. Two of the pits had charcoal rich fills with scorched/burnt bases and contained large quantities of charred plant remains including barley, oat and rye. A date in the Iron Age/early medieval period was established for one of these features and these have been interpreted as cereal-drying pits/features. The two curvilinear ditches were undated but respected the features outlined above
      185
  • Publication
    Final Report: M3 Clonee – North of Kells Motorway Scheme Archaeological Services Contract 4 Navan to Kells and Kells Bypass
    (National Roads Authority, 2010-11-10) ; ;
    This is a final report of an archaeological excavation at Grange 3 which was located on the route of the M3 Navan–Kells & Kells Bypass (Archaeological Services Contract 4) of the M3 Clonee–North of Kells Motorway Scheme, County Meath. The excavation was carried out by Dr. Amanda Kelly of Irish Archaeological Consultancy Ltd on behalf of Meath County Council and the National Roads Authority. The work was carried out under Ministerial Direction No. A029/005 and National Monuments Service (NMS) Excavation Registration No. E3123 which were received from the DoEHLG in consultation with the National Museum of Ireland. The fieldwork took place between 26 June 2006 – 26 January 2007. The excavation at Grange 3 uncovered multi-period activity spanning the early Bronze Age to the early medieval period, with four major phases of activity identified. Further contemporary activity was excavated within 500m north-west and 500m south-east in the same townland. The excavated remains from this site and the other sites in Grange indicate that this area was the focus of activity over a prolonged period indicating that the locale held a certain significance ensuring its longevity in terms of human activity.
      236
  • Publication
    Review: J. Knight 'South Wales, From the Romans to the Normans; Christianity, Literacy and Lordship' (2013) Gloucestershire: Amberley Publishing
    (Royal Society of Antiquaries in Ireland, 2011)
    Jeremy Knight’s book is an impressive exercise in efficacious brevity tracing the challenging historic narrative of south Wales from the mid-third century A.D. through to the Anglo-Norman period. The sheer wealth of evidence presented and the impressive range of disciplines considered inform this wonderfully rich account of the region’s development. The study draws on material from the fields of archaeology (both artefact and landscape), history (availing of epigraphic and manuscript material) and the onomastic, toponymic and hagiographic traditions.
      75